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Dietary Protein Consumption and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: ADose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

1
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, China
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2783; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112783
Received: 10 October 2019 / Revised: 8 November 2019 / Accepted: 12 November 2019 / Published: 15 November 2019
The relationship between dietary protein consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been inconsistent. The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the relations between dietary protein consumption and the risk of T2D. We conducted systematic retrieval of prospective studies in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Summary relative risks were compiled with a fixed effects model or a random effects model, and a restricted cubic spline regression model and generalized least squares analysis were used to evaluate the diet–T2D incidence relationship. T2D risk increased with increasing consumption of total protein and animal protein, red meat, processed meat, milk, and eggs, respectively, while plant protein and yogurt had an inverse relationship. A non-linear association with the risk for T2D was found for the consumption of plant protein, processed meat, milk, yogurt, and soy. This meta-analysis suggests that substitution of plant protein and yogurt for animal protein, especially red meat and processed meat, can reduce the risk for T2D. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein; diet; type 2 diabetes; dose-response; meta-analysis protein; diet; type 2 diabetes; dose-response; meta-analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fan, M.; Li, Y.; Wang, C.; Mao, Z.; Zhou, W.; Zhang, L.; Yang, X.; Cui, S.; Li, L. Dietary Protein Consumption and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: ADose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2783.

AMA Style

Fan M, Li Y, Wang C, Mao Z, Zhou W, Zhang L, Yang X, Cui S, Li L. Dietary Protein Consumption and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: ADose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. Nutrients. 2019; 11(11):2783.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fan, Mengying; Li, Yuqian; Wang, Chongjian; Mao, Zhenxing; Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Lulu; Yang, Xiu; Cui, Songyang; Li, Linlin. 2019. "Dietary Protein Consumption and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: ADose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies" Nutrients 11, no. 11: 2783.

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