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Low Calorie Sweeteners Differ in Their Physiological Effects in Humans

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2717; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112717
Received: 9 October 2019 / Revised: 4 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 9 November 2019
Low calorie sweeteners (LCS) are prevalent in the food supply for their primary functional property of providing sweetness with little or no energy. Though tested for safety individually, there has been extremely limited work on the efficacy of each LCS. It is commonly assumed all LCS act similarly in their behavioral and physiological effects. However, each LCS has its own chemical structure that influences its metabolism, making each LCS unique in its potential effects on body weight, energy intake, and appetite. LCS may have different behavioral and physiological effects mediated at the sweet taste receptor, in brain activation, with gut hormones, at the microbiota and on appetitive responses. Further elucidation of the unique effects of the different commercially available LCS may hold important implications for recommendations about their use for different health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: low calorie sweeteners; body weight; appetite; energy intake; microbiota; sweet taste receptor; brain activation low calorie sweeteners; body weight; appetite; energy intake; microbiota; sweet taste receptor; brain activation
MDPI and ACS Style

Hunter, S.R.; Reister, E.J.; Cheon, E.; Mattes, R.D. Low Calorie Sweeteners Differ in Their Physiological Effects in Humans. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2717. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112717

AMA Style

Hunter SR, Reister EJ, Cheon E, Mattes RD. Low Calorie Sweeteners Differ in Their Physiological Effects in Humans. Nutrients. 2019; 11(11):2717. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112717

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hunter, Stephanie R., Evan J. Reister, Eunjin Cheon, and Richard D. Mattes 2019. "Low Calorie Sweeteners Differ in Their Physiological Effects in Humans" Nutrients 11, no. 11: 2717. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112717

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