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Amino Acid Availability of a Dairy and Vegetable Protein Blend Compared to Single Casein, Whey, Soy, and Pea Proteins: A Double-Blind, Cross-Over Trial

Danone Nutricia Research, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2613; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112613
Received: 29 July 2019 / Revised: 28 October 2019 / Accepted: 28 October 2019 / Published: 1 November 2019
Protein quality is important for patients needing medical nutrition, especially those dependent on tube feeding. A blend of dairy and vegetable proteins (35% whey, 25% casein, 20% soy, 20% pea; P4) developed to obtain a more balanced amino acid profile with higher chemical scores, was compared to its constituent single proteins. Fourteen healthy elderly subjects received P4, whey, casein, soy, and pea (18 g/360 mL bolus) on five separate visits. Blood samples were collected at baseline until 240 min after intake. Amino acid availability was calculated using incremental maximal concentration (iCmax) and area under the curve (iAUC). Availability for P4 as a sum of all amino acids was similar to casein (iCmax and iAUC) and whey (iCmax) and higher vs. soy (iCmax and iAUC) and pea (iCmax). Individual amino acid availability (iCmax and iAUC) showed different profiles reflecting the composition of the protein sources: availability of leucine and methionine was higher for P4 vs. soy and pea; availability of arginine was higher for P4 vs. casein and whey. Conclusions: The P4 amino acid profile was reflected in post-prandial plasma levels and may be regarded as more balanced compared to the constituent single proteins. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein quality; enteral tube feed; protein blend; vegetable protein; amino acid composition; non-essential amino acid; leucine; methionine; arginine; glycine protein quality; enteral tube feed; protein blend; vegetable protein; amino acid composition; non-essential amino acid; leucine; methionine; arginine; glycine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, J.; Klebach, M.; Visser, M.; Hofman, Z. Amino Acid Availability of a Dairy and Vegetable Protein Blend Compared to Single Casein, Whey, Soy, and Pea Proteins: A Double-Blind, Cross-Over Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2613. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112613

AMA Style

Liu J, Klebach M, Visser M, Hofman Z. Amino Acid Availability of a Dairy and Vegetable Protein Blend Compared to Single Casein, Whey, Soy, and Pea Proteins: A Double-Blind, Cross-Over Trial. Nutrients. 2019; 11(11):2613. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112613

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Jue; Klebach, Marianne; Visser, Monique; Hofman, Zandrie. 2019. "Amino Acid Availability of a Dairy and Vegetable Protein Blend Compared to Single Casein, Whey, Soy, and Pea Proteins: A Double-Blind, Cross-Over Trial" Nutrients 11, no. 11: 2613. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112613

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