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Cognitive Restraint and History of Dieting Are Negatively Associated with Organic Food Consumption in a Large Population-Based Sample of Organic Food Consumers

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Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologies et Biostatistiques, Inserm (U1153), INRA, CNAM, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France
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INRA, UMR 1110, Marchés, organisations, institutions et stratégies d’acteurs (MOISA), F-34000 Montpellier, France
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Nutrition, obésité et risque thrombotique (NORT), Inserm, UMR S 1062, Aix Marseille Université, INRA 1260, F-13385 Marseille, France
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Santé Publique France, Unité de Surveillance et d’Épidémiologie Nutritionnelle (USEN), Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France
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Département de Santé Publique, Hôpital Avicenne, F-93000 Bobigny, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current institution: Institute of Aging (Gérontopôle), Toulouse University Hospital, Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, 31000 Toulouse, France.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2468; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102468
Received: 16 September 2019 / Revised: 7 October 2019 / Accepted: 9 October 2019 / Published: 15 October 2019
Organic food consumption has risen in many countries during the past decades, but individual motives leading to these choices remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between cognitive restraint (CR), history of dieting and organic food intake. This cross-sectional analysis included 20,085 organic food consumers from the NutriNet-Santé cohort. CR (range score 1–4) was evaluated by the Three-Factor-Eating-Questionnaire and practice of dieting (never vs. past/current) was assessed by an ad hoc questionnaire. Frequencies of organic food intake overall and in 16 food groups were assessed by the Organic Food Frequency Questionnaire. Linear regression and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed to investigate the association between CR score, history of dieting and contribution of organic food intake to the total food intake. A lower overall contribution of organic options in the diet was observed in women with higher levels of CR (β = −3.61%, 95% CI: −4.32; −2.91 for 1 point of CR, p < 0.001) and with a history of dieting (31.1 ± 0.4% in past/current vs. 32.6 ± 0.3% in never dieters; p = 0.001). Consistent associations were observed in men with a history of dieting (26.4 ± 0.8% in past/current vs. 28.7 ± 0.4% in never dieters; p = 0.012). Overall, individuals—in particular women—with higher CR scores or with a history of dieting selected fewer organic food options. Our findings illustrate the complexity of potentially concurrent motives to food choices, in a context of increasing interest in organic food consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive restraint; dieting; organic food; eating behavior; food intake cognitive restraint; dieting; organic food; eating behavior; food intake
MDPI and ACS Style

Giudici, K.V.; Baudry, J.; Méjean, C.; Lairon, D.; Bénard, M.; Hercberg, S.; Bellisle, F.; Kesse-Guyot, E.; Péneau, S. Cognitive Restraint and History of Dieting Are Negatively Associated with Organic Food Consumption in a Large Population-Based Sample of Organic Food Consumers. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2468.

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