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Review

Regulation of Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Endotoxemia with Dietary Factors

1
Department of Nature & Wellness Research, Innovation Division, KAGOME CO., LTD., Nasushiobara 329-2762, Japan
2
Department of Cellular and Molecular Function Analysis, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa 920-8640, Japan
3
Division of Metabolism and Biosystemic Science, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa 078-8510, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2277; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102277
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 13 September 2019 / Accepted: 18 September 2019 / Published: 23 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Compounds Impact on Human Gut Microbiome and Gut Health)
Metabolic endotoxemia is a condition in which blood lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels are elevated, regardless of the presence of obvious infection. It has been suggested to lead to chronic inflammation-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), pancreatitis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, it has attracted attention as a target for the prevention and treatment of these chronic diseases. As metabolic endotoxemia was first reported in mice that were fed a high-fat diet, research regarding its relationship with diets has been actively conducted in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the relationship between fat intake and induction of metabolic endotoxemia, focusing on gut dysbiosis and the influx, kinetics, and metabolism of LPS. We also summarize the recent findings about dietary factors that attenuate metabolic endotoxemia, focusing on the regulation of gut microbiota. We hope that in the future, control of metabolic endotoxemia using dietary factors will help maintain human health. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic endotoxemia; lipopolysaccharide; gut microbiota; dietary factors metabolic endotoxemia; lipopolysaccharide; gut microbiota; dietary factors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fuke, N.; Nagata, N.; Suganuma, H.; Ota, T. Regulation of Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Endotoxemia with Dietary Factors. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2277. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102277

AMA Style

Fuke N, Nagata N, Suganuma H, Ota T. Regulation of Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Endotoxemia with Dietary Factors. Nutrients. 2019; 11(10):2277. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102277

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fuke, Nobuo, Naoto Nagata, Hiroyuki Suganuma, and Tsuguhito Ota. 2019. "Regulation of Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Endotoxemia with Dietary Factors" Nutrients 11, no. 10: 2277. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102277

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