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Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1274; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091274

Gluten-Free Diet: From Development to Assessment of a Check-List Designed for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services

1
Department of Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, Brasilia DF 70910-900, Brazil
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, Brasilia DF 70910-900, Brazil
3
Department of Statistics, Central Institute of Sciences, University of Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, Brasilia DF 70910-900, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 August 2018 / Revised: 3 September 2018 / Accepted: 7 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
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Abstract

Gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food may jeopardize treatment of celiac patients. Considering the deficit of appropriate instruments to enable the implementation of safe production practices for gluten-free food, this study aimed to evaluate the application of a check-list elaborated for gluten cross-contamination prevention in food services. The instrument was applied in 60 Brazilian food services. Interobserver reproducibility and internal consistency of the check-list were tested. A score classification was created for establishments according to the food contamination risk assessment. Subsequent to the application and statistical analysis, the original instrument was reduced to a 30-item check-list. In the reproducibility analysis, none of the 30 items showed significant divergence among the evaluators (p > 0.05 in the Cochran Q test). The 30-item version of the check-list presented Kuder–Richardson Formula 20 (KR-20) = 0.771, indicating good internal consistency. The proposed classification score is obtained by adding 1 point for each item with an “adequate” response; therefore, the final score may vary between 0 and 30 points. Establishments with up to 15 points exhibit risk of gluten contamination, while establishments with a score above 16 points exhibit low risk of contamination. The check-list displayed good reproducibility and internal consistency, suggesting that it could be a useful gluten contamination control instrument in food services. View Full-Text
Keywords: gluten; cross-contamination; food safety; check-list; celiac disease gluten; cross-contamination; food safety; check-list; celiac disease
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Farage, P.; Puppin Zandonadi, R.; Cortez Ginani, V.; Gandolfi, L.; Yoshio Nakano, E.; Pratesi, R. Gluten-Free Diet: From Development to Assessment of a Check-List Designed for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1274.

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