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Open AccessArticle

The Association of Dietary Cholesterol and Fatty Acids with Dyslipidemia in Chinese Metropolitan Men and Women

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Division of Health Risk Factors Monitoring and Control, Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1380 West Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 20036, China
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Division of Non-communicable Diseases Prevention and Control, Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1380 West Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 20036, China
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Division of Health information, Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1380 West Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 20036, China
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Department of Public Health, Shanghai Baoshan District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 158 Mingyue Road, Shanghai 201901, China
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National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 961; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10080961
Received: 24 June 2018 / Revised: 8 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
Background: The associations between dietary cholesterol and fatty acids and serum lipids are controversial. This study is to examine the association of dietary cholesterol and fatty acids with serum lipids and dyslipidemia in Chinese metropolitan male and female adults. Methods: 3850 participants in the Shanghai Diet and Health Survey were investigated during the period 2012–2013. Information was obtained on dietary intake, anthropometric and blood laboratory measurements. Dyslipidemia was determined by US National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III). Results: Dietary cholesterol was in line with serum TC, LDL-C and the LDL-C to HDL-C ratio in general and the partial correlation coefficients were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.13–1.15, p = 0.015), 0.73 (95% CI: 0.21–1.24, p = 0.006) and 0.01 (95% CI: 0.00–0.02, p = 0.018), respectively. The partial correlation coefficients were greater in women. Dietary fatty acids were not associated with serum lipids. The highest quintile of dietary cholesterol intake (≥538.0 mg/day) was associated with an approximate 1.6-fold risk for high TC and high HDL-C compared with the lowest quintile (<193.1 mg/day) generally. Conclusions: Dietary cholesterol was associated with serum cholesterol in Chinese metropolitan adults and a higher risk of dyslipidemia was observed at a high level of dietary cholesterol intake. Whether there should be an upper limit on dietary cholesterol in the Chinese population warrants further study. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary cholesterol; dietary fatty acids; serum lipids; dyslipidemia; population-based epidemiology dietary cholesterol; dietary fatty acids; serum lipids; dyslipidemia; population-based epidemiology
MDPI and ACS Style

Zhu, Z.; Wu, F.; Lu, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zang, J.; Yu, H.; Guo, C.; Jia, X.; Shen, X.; Ding, G. The Association of Dietary Cholesterol and Fatty Acids with Dyslipidemia in Chinese Metropolitan Men and Women. Nutrients 2018, 10, 961.

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