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Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081127

Red Blood Cell Aggregation-Associated Dietary Pattern Predicts Hyperlipidemia and Metabolic Syndrome

1
School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
2
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
3
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
4
Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
5
Graduate Institute of Metabolism and Obesity Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
6
Nutrition Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
7
Chinese Taipei Society for the Study of Obesity, CTSSO, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 5 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 20 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Management of Dyslipidemia)
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Abstract

Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and iron status are interrelated and strongly influenced by dietary factors, and their alterations pose a great risk of dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Currently, RBC aggregation-related dietary patterns remain unclear. This study investigated the dietary patterns that were associated with RBC aggregation and their predictive effects on hyperlipidemia and MetS. Anthropometric and blood biochemical data and food frequency questionnaires were collected from 212 adults. Dietary patterns were derived using reduced rank regression from 32 food groups. Adjusted linear regression showed that hepcidin, soluble CD163, and serum transferrin saturation (%TS) independently predicted RBC aggregation (all p < 0.01). Age-, sex-, and log-transformed body mass index (BMI)-adjusted prevalence rate ratio (PRR) showed a significant positive correlation between RBC aggregation and hyperlipidemia (p-trend < 0.05). RBC aggregation and iron-related dietary pattern scores (high consumption of noodles and deep-fried foods and low intake of steamed, boiled, and raw food, dairy products, orange, red, and purple vegetables, white and light-green vegetables, seafood, and rice) were also significantly associated with hyperlipidemia (p-trend < 0.05) and MetS (p-trend = 0.01) after adjusting for age, sex, and log-transformed BMI. Our results may help dieticians develop dietary strategies for preventing dyslipidemia and MetS. View Full-Text
Keywords: red blood cell aggregation; hepcidin; soluble (s) CD163; dietary pattern; dyslipidemia; metabolic syndrome red blood cell aggregation; hepcidin; soluble (s) CD163; dietary pattern; dyslipidemia; metabolic syndrome
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Lin, P.; Chang, C.-C.; Yuan, K.-C.; Yeh, H.-J.; Fang, S.-U.; Cheng, T.; Teng, K.-T.; Chao, K.-C.; Tang, J.-H.; Kao, W.-Y.; Lin, P.-Y.; Liu, J.-S.; Chang, J.-S. Red Blood Cell Aggregation-Associated Dietary Pattern Predicts Hyperlipidemia and Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1127.

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