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Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 825; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070825

Beverage Consumption Patterns among Infants and Young Children (0–47.9 Months): Data from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study, 2016

1
Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, 310 Trent Dr, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2
Nestlé Research Center, Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, Route du Jorat 57, Case Postale 44, 1000 Lausanne-26, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 18 June 2018 / Accepted: 22 June 2018 / Published: 26 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Early Life Nutrition: From Nutrients to Systems)
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Abstract

(1) Background: Data about early life beverage intake patterns is sparse. We describe beverage patterns among infants and young children from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016. (2) Methods: FITS 2016 is a cross-sectional survey of U.S. parents/caregivers of children 0–47.9 months (n = 3235). Food and beverage intakes were collected by 24-h dietary recalls to describe beverage consumption patterns including: a) prevalence of consumption, per capita and per consumer intake, b) contribution to intake of calories and key nutrients, and c) prevalence according to eating occasions. (3) Results: Breast milk and infant formula were commonly consumed among <12-month-olds. Among 12–23.9-month-olds, the most commonly consumed beverage was whole milk (67% consuming), followed by 100% juice (50% consuming). Plain drinking water was consumed by 70% of 12–23.9-month-olds and 78% of 24–47.9-month-olds. Among 12–47.9-month-olds, milks provided more energy and key nutrients than all other beverages. Across eating occasions, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, especially in the form of fruit-flavored drinks, was higher among 24–47.9 compared to 12–23.9-month-olds. Only 23–32% of ≥12-month-olds consumed milk or water at lunch or dinner. (4) Conclusions: Opportunities exist to improve beverage patterns. Future interventions may benefit from focusing on timely introduction of age-appropriate beverages and reducing consumption of SSBs. View Full-Text
Keywords: Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study; FITS 2016; beverage intake; breastfeeding; infants; toddlers; preschoolers; sugar-sweetened beverages; juice; water; milk Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study; FITS 2016; beverage intake; breastfeeding; infants; toddlers; preschoolers; sugar-sweetened beverages; juice; water; milk
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Kay, M.C.; Welker, E.B.; Jacquier, E.F.; Story, M.T. Beverage Consumption Patterns among Infants and Young Children (0–47.9 Months): Data from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study, 2016. Nutrients 2018, 10, 825.

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