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A Mediterranean Diet Model in Australia: Strategies for Translating the Traditional Mediterranean Diet into a Multicultural Setting

1
Department of Rehabilitation, Nutrition and Sport, La Trobe University, Health Sciences 3, Kingsbury Drive, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
2
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Building J, 221 Burwood Hwy, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia
3
School of Allied Health, University of Limerick, Castletroy, Limerick V94 T9PX, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040465
Received: 2 March 2018 / Revised: 4 April 2018 / Accepted: 8 April 2018 / Published: 9 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Mediterranean Diet)
Substantial evidence supports the effect of the Mediterranean Diet (MD) for managing chronic diseases, although trials have been primarily conducted in Mediterranean populations. The efficacy and feasibility of the Mediterranean dietary pattern for the management of chronic diseases has not been extensively evaluated in non-Mediterranean settings. This paper aims to describe the development of a MD model that complies with principles of the traditional MD applied in a multiethnic context. Optimal macronutrient and food-based composition was defined, and a two-week menu was devised incorporating traditional ingredients with evidence based on improvements in chronic disease management. Strategies were developed for the implementation of the diet model in a multiethnic population. Consistent with the principles of a traditional MD, the MD model was plant-based and high in dietary fat, predominantly monounsaturated fatty acids from extra virgin olive oil. Fruits, vegetables and wholegrains were a mainstay, and moderate amounts of nuts and seeds, fish, dairy and red wine were recommended. The diet encompassed key features of the MD including cuisine, biodiversity and sustainability. The MD model preserved traditional dietary components likely to elicit health benefits for individuals with chronic diseases, even with the adaptation to an Australian multiethnic population. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mediterranean diet; dietary intervention; diet; nutrition; translation; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; cardiovascular disease Mediterranean diet; dietary intervention; diet; nutrition; translation; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; cardiovascular disease
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George, E.S.; Kucianski, T.; Mayr, H.L.; Moschonis, G.; Tierney, A.C.; Itsiopoulos, C. A Mediterranean Diet Model in Australia: Strategies for Translating the Traditional Mediterranean Diet into a Multicultural Setting. Nutrients 2018, 10, 465.

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