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Open AccessArticle

Use of Iodine-Containing Dietary Supplements Remains Low among Women of Reproductive Age in the United States: NHANES 2011–2014

1
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
2
National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040422
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 23 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 29 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micronutrients Intake and Status during Pregnancy and Lactation)
In the United States, the American Thyroid Association recommends that women take a dietary supplement containing 150 µg of iodine 3 months prior to conception and while pregnant and lactating to support fetal growth and neurological development. We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2014 to describe the use of dietary supplements with and without iodine in the past 30 days among 2155 non-pregnant, non-lactating (NPNL) women; 122 pregnant women; and 61 lactating women. Among NPNL women, 45.3% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 42.0, 48.6) used any dietary supplement and 14.8% (95% CI: 12.7, 16.8) used a dietary supplement with iodine in the past 30 days. Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women were less likely to use any dietary supplement as well as one with iodine, than non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic Asian women (p < 0.05). Among pregnant women, 72.2% (95% CI: 65.8, 78.6) used any dietary supplement; however, only 17.8% (95% CI: 11.4, 24.3) used a dietary supplement with iodine. Among lactating women, 75.0% (95% CI: 63.0, 87.0) used a dietary supplement; however, only 19.0% (95% CI: 8.8, 29.2) used a dietary supplement with iodine. Among NPNL women using a supplement with iodine, median daily iodine intake was 75.0 µg. Self-reported data suggests that the use of iodine containing dietary supplements among pregnant and lactating women remains low in contrast with current recommendations. View Full-Text
Keywords: iodine; supplements; pregnant; lactating; women of reproductive age iodine; supplements; pregnant; lactating; women of reproductive age
MDPI and ACS Style

Gupta, P.M.; Gahche, J.J.; Herrick, K.A.; Ershow, A.G.; Potischman, N.; Perrine, C.G. Use of Iodine-Containing Dietary Supplements Remains Low among Women of Reproductive Age in the United States: NHANES 2011–2014. Nutrients 2018, 10, 422.

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