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Correction published on 4 January 2019, see Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 84.
Open AccessArticle

Trimester-Specific Dietary Intakes in a Sample of French-Canadian Pregnant Women in Comparison with National Nutritional Guidelines

1
School of Nutrition, Laval University, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Endocrinology and Nephrology Unit, CHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Center, Québec City, QC G1V 4G2, Canada
3
Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
4
Department of Medicine, Laval University, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
5
School of Nutrition Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
6
Institut du Savoir Montfort, Montfort Hospital, Ottawa, ON K1K 0T2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060768
Received: 14 May 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micronutrients Intake and Status during Pregnancy and Lactation)
Diet during pregnancy greatly impacts health outcomes. This study aims to measure changes in dietary intakes throughout trimesters and to assess pregnant women’s dietary intakes in comparison with current Canadian nutritional recommendations. Seventy-nine pregnant women were recruited and completed, within each trimester, three Web-based 24-h dietary recalls and one Web questionnaire on supplement use. Dietary intakes from food, with and without supplements, were compared to nutritional recommendations throughout pregnancy. Energy and macronutrient intakes remained stable throughout pregnancy. A majority of women exceeded their energy and protein requirements in the first trimester, and fat intakes as a percentage of energy intakes were above recommendations for more than half of the women in all trimesters. Supplement use increased dietary intakes of most vitamins and minerals, but 20% of women still had inadequate total vitamin D intakes and most women had excessive folic acid intakes. This study showed that pregnant women did not increase their energy intakes throughout pregnancy as recommended. Furthermore, although prenatal supplementation reduces the risk of inadequate intake for most micronutrients, there is still a risk of excessive folic acid and insufficient vitamin D intake, which needs further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; dietary intakes; energy intakes; supplements; dietary reference intakes (DRIs) pregnancy; dietary intakes; energy intakes; supplements; dietary reference intakes (DRIs)
MDPI and ACS Style

Savard, C.; Lemieux, S.; Weisnagel, S.J.; Fontaine-Bisson, B.; Gagnon, C.; Robitaille, J.; Morisset, A.-S. Trimester-Specific Dietary Intakes in a Sample of French-Canadian Pregnant Women in Comparison with National Nutritional Guidelines. Nutrients 2018, 10, 768.

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