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Protein for Life: Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults

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Rowett Institute, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Ashgrove Road West, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK
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National Institute for Health Research, Bristol Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
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Department of Oncology & Metabolism, The Medical School, The University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK
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Insigneo Institute for in silico medicine, The Pam Liversidge Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK
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Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZT, UK
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Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Medical School, Newcastle University, William Leech Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
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Campden BRI, Station Rd, Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire GL55 6LD, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 360; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030360
Received: 21 February 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 14 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
With an ageing population, dietary approaches to promote health and independence later in life are needed. In part, this can be achieved by maintaining muscle mass and strength as people age. New evidence suggests that current dietary recommendations for protein intake may be insufficient to achieve this goal and that individuals might benefit by increasing their intake and frequency of consumption of high-quality protein. However, the environmental effects of increasing animal-protein production are a concern, and alternative, more sustainable protein sources should be considered. Protein is known to be more satiating than other macronutrients, and it is unclear whether diets high in plant proteins affect the appetite of older adults as they should be recommended for individuals at risk of malnutrition. The review considers the protein needs of an ageing population (>40 years old), sustainable protein sources, appetite-related implications of diets high in plant proteins, and related areas for future research. View Full-Text
Keywords: ageing; appetite; older adults; plant proteins; protein; sarcopenia; sustainability ageing; appetite; older adults; plant proteins; protein; sarcopenia; sustainability
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Lonnie, M.; Hooker, E.; Brunstrom, J.M.; Corfe, B.M.; Green, M.A.; Watson, A.W.; Williams, E.A.; Stevenson, E.J.; Penson, S.; Johnstone, A.M. Protein for Life: Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults. Nutrients 2018, 10, 360.

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