Next Article in Journal
Fatty Acids Dietary Supplements Exert Anti-Inflammatory Action and Limit Ganglion Cell Degeneration in the Retina of the EAE Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis
Next Article in Special Issue
Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluating Human Intestinal Cell Lines for Studying Dietary Protein Absorption
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dietary Acid Load and Potassium Intake Associate with Blood Pressure and Hypertension Prevalence in a Representative Sample of the German Adult Population
Open AccessArticle

Effects of 12-Week Low or Moderate Dietary Acid Intake on Acid–Base Status and Kidney Function at Rest and during Submaximal Cycling

1
Biology of Physical Activity, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (VIV), 40014 Jyväskylä, Finland
2
General Clinical Research Center, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94117, USA
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine, German Sport University, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany
4
Honka Holding, c/o Honkatarhat Oy, Kirkkokallio 20, 38950 Honkajoki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 323; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030323
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 5 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Prevention and Acid Base Status)
Prolonged effects of dietary acid intake on acid–base status and kidney function have not yet been studied in an intervention study in healthy subjects. Dietary acid load can be estimated by calculating the potential renal acid load (PRAL) of foods. Effects of low-PRAL and moderate-PRAL diets on acid–base status and kidney function were investigated during a 12-week exercise training period. Healthy, 20–50-year-old men (n = 21) and women (n = 25) participated in the study and were randomly divided into low-PRAL and moderate-PRAL groups. Before (PRE), mid-phase (MID) and after the intervention (POST), the subjects participated in measurement sessions, where a 12-h urine sample and fasting blood samples were collected, and a submaximal cycle ergometer test was performed. Net acid excretion was significantly lower after 12 weeks of the low-PRAL diet as compared to the moderate-PRAL diet, both in men and women. In low-PRAL females, capillary pH and bicarbonate were significantly higher at 75% of VO2max at POST as compared to PRE. Glomerular filtration rate decreased over the study period in moderate-PRAL men and women. The results of the present study suggest that an acidogenic diet and regularly training together may increase the acidic load of the body and start to impair the kidney function in recreationally active subjects. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary acid load; acid–base status; net acid excretion; exercise training; kidney function dietary acid load; acid–base status; net acid excretion; exercise training; kidney function
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hietavala, E.-M.; Ihalainen, J.K.; Frassetto, L.A.; Schumann, M.; Eklund, D.; Pitkänen, H.; Häkkinen, K.; Mero, A.A. Effects of 12-Week Low or Moderate Dietary Acid Intake on Acid–Base Status and Kidney Function at Rest and during Submaximal Cycling. Nutrients 2018, 10, 323.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop