Next Article in Journal
Walnut Consumption for Two Years and Leukocyte Telomere Attrition in Mediterranean Elders: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Previous Article in Journal
Changes in Dietary Intake and Adherence to the NU-AGE Diet Following a One-Year Dietary Intervention among European Older Adults—Results of the NU-AGE Randomized Trial
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1909; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121909

It Is Time to Make Policy for Healthier Food Environments in Australian Universities

1
The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Nutrition and Dietetics Group, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 November 2018 / Accepted: 30 November 2018 / Published: 4 December 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [374 KB, uploaded 4 December 2018]   |  
  |   Review Reports

Abstract

The obesogenic food environment is likely driving excessive weight gain in young adults. Our study aimed to investigate the nutritional quality of current food and drink offerings in an Australian university. This cross-sectional study included baseline environmental audits of 30 food outlets and 62 vending machines across campus. A recent food and drink benchmark for health facilities by state government was used to classify the food and beverage offerings. It recommended food outlets and vending machines to offer at least 75% ‘Everyday’ (healthy) and less than 25% ‘Occasional’ (less healthy) foods and drinks. Sugary drinks and options with large portion sizes and unhealthy ingredients should be removed from sale. Only two beverage vending machines and none of the food outlets met the full recommendations. The overall proportions of Everyday and Occasional foods in food outlets were 35% and 22%, respectively with 43% falling into the category that should not be sold. Sugary drinks occupied a third of beverage varieties in outlets and 38% of beverage slots in vending machines. The current university food environment was poorly compliant with the existing benchmark. Specific food policy in the university setting may be needed to make healthier choices more accessible to young adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: food environment; food outlets; vending machines; university; college; young adults; food policy food environment; food outlets; vending machines; university; college; young adults; food policy
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Shi, Y.; Wang, Q.; Norman, C.; Allman-Farinelli, M.; Colagiuri, S. It Is Time to Make Policy for Healthier Food Environments in Australian Universities. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1909.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top