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Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111721

The Effect of Dietary Mushroom Agaricus bisporus on Intestinal Microbiota Composition and Host Immunological Function

1
Diet Genomics and Immunology Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Northeast Area, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
2
Microbiome Analysis Center, George Mason University, Science & Technology Campus, Manassas, VA 20108, USA
3
Statistics Group, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Northeast Area, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 September 2018 / Revised: 28 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
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Abstract

A study was designed to determine the potential prebiotic effect of dietary mushrooms on the host immune response, and intestinal microbiota composition and function. Thirty-one six-week-old pigs were fed a pig grower diet alone or supplemented with either three or six servings of freeze-dried white button (WB)-mushrooms for six weeks. Host immune response was evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and alveolar macrophages (AM) after stimulation with Salmonella typhymurium-Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Isolated DNA from fecal and proximal colon contents were used for 16S rDNA taxonomic analysis and linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) to determine bacterial abundance and metabolic function. Pigs gained weight with no difference in body composition or intestinal permeability. Feeding mushrooms reduced LPS-induced IL-1β gene expression in AM (P < 0.05) with no change in LPS-stimulated PBMC or the intestinal mucosa transcriptome. LEfSe indicated increases in Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae within the order Clostridiales with a shift in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in the mushroom-fed pigs. These results suggested that feeding WB mushrooms significantly reduced the LPS-induced inflammatory response in AM and positively modulated the host microbiota metabolism by increasing the abundance of Clostridiales taxa that are associated with improved intestinal health. View Full-Text
Keywords: mushroom; microbiome; immune response; macrophage; 16S rDNA mushroom; microbiome; immune response; macrophage; 16S rDNA
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Solano-Aguilar, G.I.; Jang, S.; Lakshman, S.; Gupta, R.; Beshah, E.; Sikaroodi, M.; Vinyard, B.; Molokin, A.; Gillevet, P.M.; Urban, J.F., Jr. The Effect of Dietary Mushroom Agaricus bisporus on Intestinal Microbiota Composition and Host Immunological Function. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1721.

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