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Relative Validity and Reproducibility of a Food Frequency Questionnaire to Assess Nutrients and Food Groups of Relevance to the Gut Microbiota in Young Children
 
 
Article

The Impact of Front-of-Package Label Design on Consumer Understanding of Nutrient Amounts

School of Public Health & Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
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Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1624; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111624
Received: 3 October 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 19 October 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
A between-groups experiment examined the salience of front-of-package (FOP) symbols. Adults from Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK completed an online survey (n = 11,617). Respondents were randomized to view cereal boxes displaying one of 11 FOP label conditions for ‘high’ levels of sugar and saturated fat: control (no FOP symbol), red circle, red ‘stop sign’, magnifying glass, magnifying glass + exclamation mark, and ‘caution’ triangle + exclamation mark, plus each of these five conditions accompanied by a ‘high in’ text descriptor. Participants identified the amount of saturated fat and sugar in the product (‘low’/’moderate’/’high’). Participants were more likely to correctly identify the product as ‘high’ in saturated fat or sugar when shown the stop sign, triangle + exclamation mark, red circle, or magnifying glass + exclamation mark symbols incorporating ‘high in’ text (p < 0.01). The magnifying glass was the least effective symbol. The stop sign (37.7%) and triangle + exclamation mark (22.0%) were most frequently selected as the best symbol for indicating high nutrient amounts. Overall, FOP labels with ‘high in’ descriptions, red color and intuitive ‘warning’ symbols (e.g., stop signs, exclamation marks, ‘caution’ triangles) were more effective at communicating high levels of nutrients of public health concern in a time-limited environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; adult; front-of-package; nutrition label; experiment diet; adult; front-of-package; nutrition label; experiment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goodman, S.; Vanderlee, L.; Acton, R.; Mahamad, S.; Hammond, D. The Impact of Front-of-Package Label Design on Consumer Understanding of Nutrient Amounts. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1624. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111624

AMA Style

Goodman S, Vanderlee L, Acton R, Mahamad S, Hammond D. The Impact of Front-of-Package Label Design on Consumer Understanding of Nutrient Amounts. Nutrients. 2018; 10(11):1624. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goodman, Samantha, Lana Vanderlee, Rachel Acton, Syed Mahamad, and David Hammond. 2018. "The Impact of Front-of-Package Label Design on Consumer Understanding of Nutrient Amounts" Nutrients 10, no. 11: 1624. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111624

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