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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1479; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101479

Screening and Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus after Bariatric Surgery

1
Department of Endocrinology, University hospital Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University hospital Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
3
Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
4
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Centre for Research and Innovation in Care (CRIC), University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
5
Faculty of Health and Social Work, research unit Healthy Living, University Colleges Leuven-Limburg, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
6
Department of Chronic Diseases, Metabolism and Ageing, KU Leuven, Herestraat, 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 18 September 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Gestational Diabetes)
Full-Text   |   PDF [446 KB, uploaded 11 October 2018]   |  

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a frequent medical complication during pregnancy. This is partly due to the increasing prevalence of obesity in women of childbearing age. Since bariatric surgery is currently the most successful way to achieve maintained weight loss, increasing numbers of obese women of childbearing age receive bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery performed before pregnancy significantly reduces the risk to develop GDM but the risk is generally still higher compared to normal weight pregnant women. Women after bariatric surgery therefore still require screening for GDM. However, screening for GDM is challenging in pregnant women after bariatric surgery. The standard screening tests such as an oral glucose tolerance test are often not well tolerated and wide variations in glucose excursions make the diagnosis difficult. Capillary blood glucose measurements may currently be the most acceptable alternative for screening in pregnancy after bariatric surgery. In addition, pregnant women after bariatric surgery have an increased risk for small neonates and need careful nutritional and foetal monitoring. In this review, we address the risk to develop GDM after bariatric surgery, the challenges to screen for GDM and the management of women with GDM after bariatric surgery. View Full-Text
Keywords: gestational diabetes mellitus; screening; bariatric surgery; pregnancy; obesity gestational diabetes mellitus; screening; bariatric surgery; pregnancy; obesity
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Benhalima, K.; Minschart, C.; Ceulemans, D.; Bogaerts, A.; Van Der Schueren, B.; Mathieu, C.; Devlieger, R. Screening and Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus after Bariatric Surgery. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1479.

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