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Open AccessArticle

A Combination of Coffee Compounds Shows Insulin-Sensitizing and Hepatoprotective Effects in a Rat Model of Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome

1
Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Tage-Hansens Gade 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
2
The Danish Diabetes Academy, Odense University Hospital, Kløvervænget 10, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
3
Department of Animal Science, Aarhus University, 8830 Tjele, Denmark
4
MR Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
5
Institute of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010006
Received: 25 October 2017 / Revised: 14 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 December 2017 / Published: 22 December 2017
Since coffee may help to prevent the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), we aimed to evaluate the short- and long-term effects of a coffee-based supplement on different features of diet-induced MetS. In this study, 24 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control or nutraceuticals groups to receive a high-fat/high-fructose diet with or without a mixture of caffeic acid (30 mg/day), trigonelline (20 mg/day), and cafestol (1 mg/day) for 12 weeks. An additional 11 rats were assigned to an acute crossover study. In the chronic experiment, nutraceuticals did not alter body weight or glycemic control, but improved fed hyperinsulinemia (mean difference = 30.80 mU/L, p = 0.044) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (mean difference = 15.29, p = 0.033), and plasma adiponectin levels (mean difference = −0.99 µg/mL, p = 0.048). The impact of nutraceuticals on post-prandial glycemia tended to be more pronounced after acute administration than at the end of the chronic study. Circulating (mean difference = 4.75 U/L, p = 0.014) and intrahepatocellular alanine transaminase activity was assessed by hyperpolarized-13C nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spectroscopy and found to be reduced by coffee nutraceuticals at endpoint. There was also a tendency towards lower liver triglyceride content and histological steatosis score in the intervention group. In conclusion, a mixture of coffee nutraceuticals improved insulin sensitivity and exhibited hepatoprotective effects in a rat model of MetS. Higher dosages with or without caffeine deserve to be studied in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: coffee; dietary supplements; metabolic syndrome X; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; adiponectin; hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy coffee; dietary supplements; metabolic syndrome X; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; adiponectin; hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy
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Shokouh, P.; Jeppesen, P.B.; Hermansen, K.; Nørskov, N.P.; Laustsen, C.; Jacques Hamilton-Dutoit, S.; Qi, H.; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H.; Gregersen, S. A Combination of Coffee Compounds Shows Insulin-Sensitizing and Hepatoprotective Effects in a Rat Model of Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2018, 10, 6.

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