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Technical Note

Application of Copernicus Data for Climate-Relevant Urban Planning Using the Example of Water, Heat, and Vegetation

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Faculty of Civil Engineering, Konstanz University of Applied Sciences, 78462 Konstanz, Germany
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Institute of Engineering Geodesy (IIGS), University of Stuttgart, 70174 Stuttgart, Germany
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Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon GmbH, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
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Mayor’s Department, City of Konstanz, 78462 Konstanz, Germany
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Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering, Technical University Munich, 80333 Munich, Germany
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Benefit Unternehmensentwicklung GmbH, 77933 Lahr, Germany
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Tejeda Ing. Büro für Planung und Projektmanagement, 39365 Eilsleben, Germany
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str.ucture GmbH, 70176 Stuttgart, Germany
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Esri Deutschland GmbH, 85402 Kranzberg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria Kouli
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(18), 3634; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13183634
Received: 15 July 2021 / Revised: 2 September 2021 / Accepted: 8 September 2021 / Published: 11 September 2021
Specific climate adaptation and resilience measures can be efficiently designed and implemented at regional and local levels. Climate and environmental databases are critical for achieving the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and for efficiently planning and implementing appropriate adaptation measures. Available federated and distributed databases can serve as necessary starting points for municipalities to identify needs, prioritize resources, and allocate investments, taking into account often tight budget constraints. High-quality geospatial, climate, and environmental data are now broadly available and remote sensing data, e.g., Copernicus services, will be critical. There are forward-looking approaches to use these datasets to derive forecasts for optimizing urban planning processes for local governments. On the municipal level, however, the existing data have only been used to a limited extent. There are no adequate tools for urban planning with which remote sensing data can be merged and meaningfully combined with local data and further processed and applied in municipal planning and decision-making. Therefore, our project CoKLIMAx aims at the development of new digital products, advanced urban services, and procedures, such as the development of practical technical tools that capture different remote sensing and in-situ data sets for validation and further processing. CoKLIMAx will be used to develop a scalable toolbox for urban planning to increase climate resilience. Focus areas of the project will be water (e.g., soil sealing, stormwater drainage, retention, and flood protection), urban (micro)climate (e.g., heat islands and air flows), and vegetation (e.g., greening strategy, vegetation monitoring/vitality). To this end, new digital process structures will be embedded in local government to enable better policy decisions for the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; city resilience; sustainable development; urban planning; remote sensing; internet of things; water management; heat islands; digital transformation; data analytics climate change; city resilience; sustainable development; urban planning; remote sensing; internet of things; water management; heat islands; digital transformation; data analytics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bühler, M.M.; Sebald, C.; Rechid, D.; Baier, E.; Michalski, A.; Rothstein, B.; Nübel, K.; Metzner, M.; Schwieger, V.; Harrs, J.-A.; Jacob, D.; Köhler, L.; in het Panhuis, G.; Tejeda, R.C.R.; Herrmann, M.; Buziek, G. Application of Copernicus Data for Climate-Relevant Urban Planning Using the Example of Water, Heat, and Vegetation. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 3634. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13183634

AMA Style

Bühler MM, Sebald C, Rechid D, Baier E, Michalski A, Rothstein B, Nübel K, Metzner M, Schwieger V, Harrs J-A, Jacob D, Köhler L, in het Panhuis G, Tejeda RCR, Herrmann M, Buziek G. Application of Copernicus Data for Climate-Relevant Urban Planning Using the Example of Water, Heat, and Vegetation. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(18):3634. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13183634

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bühler, Michael M., Christoph Sebald, Diana Rechid, Eberhard Baier, Alexander Michalski, Benno Rothstein, Konrad Nübel, Martin Metzner, Volker Schwieger, Jan-Albrecht Harrs, Daniela Jacob, Lothar Köhler, Gunnar in het Panhuis, Raymundo C.R. Tejeda, Michael Herrmann, and Gerd Buziek. 2021. "Application of Copernicus Data for Climate-Relevant Urban Planning Using the Example of Water, Heat, and Vegetation" Remote Sensing 13, no. 18: 3634. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13183634

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