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Review

A Decade of Modern Bridge Monitoring Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning: Review and Future Directions

1
Centre for Infrastructure Engineering, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
2
Faculty of Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil 5619, Iran
3
School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
4
Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, 2600 Delft, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(22), 3796; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12223796
Received: 9 October 2020 / Revised: 9 November 2020 / Accepted: 17 November 2020 / Published: 19 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lidar Remote Sensing in 3D Object Modelling)
Over the last decade, particular interest in using state-of-the-art emerging technologies for inspection, assessment, and management of civil infrastructures has remarkably increased. Advanced technologies, such as laser scanners, have become a suitable alternative for labor intensive, expensive, and unsafe traditional inspection and maintenance methods, which encourage the increasing use of this technology in construction industry, especially in bridges. This paper aims to provide a thorough mixed scientometric and state-of-the-art review on the application of terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) in bridge engineering and explore investigations and recommendations of researchers in this area. Following the review, more than 1500 research publications were collected, investigated and analyzed through a two-fold literature search published within the last decade from 2010 to 2020. Research trends, consisting of dominated sub-fields, co-occurrence of keywords, network of researchers and their institutions, along with the interaction of research networks, were quantitatively analyzed. Moreover, based on the collected papers, application of TLS in bridge engineering and asset management was reviewed according to four categories including (1) generation of 3D model, (2) quality inspection, (3) structural assessment, and (4) bridge information modeling (BrIM). Finally, the paper identifies the current research gaps, future directions obtained from the quantitative analysis, and in-depth discussions of the collected papers in this area. View Full-Text
Keywords: terrestrial laser scanner (TLS); bridge; 3D model reconstruction; quality inspection; structural assessment; bridge information modeling (BrIM) terrestrial laser scanner (TLS); bridge; 3D model reconstruction; quality inspection; structural assessment; bridge information modeling (BrIM)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rashidi, M.; Mohammadi, M.; Sadeghlou Kivi, S.; Abdolvand, M.M.; Truong-Hong, L.; Samali, B. A Decade of Modern Bridge Monitoring Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning: Review and Future Directions. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 3796. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12223796

AMA Style

Rashidi M, Mohammadi M, Sadeghlou Kivi S, Abdolvand MM, Truong-Hong L, Samali B. A Decade of Modern Bridge Monitoring Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning: Review and Future Directions. Remote Sensing. 2020; 12(22):3796. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12223796

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rashidi, Maria, Masoud Mohammadi, Saba Sadeghlou Kivi, Mohammad Mehdi Abdolvand, Linh Truong-Hong, and Bijan Samali. 2020. "A Decade of Modern Bridge Monitoring Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning: Review and Future Directions" Remote Sensing 12, no. 22: 3796. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12223796

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