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Open AccessArticle

The Case for a Single Channel Composite Arctic Sea Surface Temperature Algorithm

Department of Physics and Space Science, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4, Canada
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(20), 2393; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11202393
Received: 13 September 2019 / Revised: 13 October 2019 / Accepted: 14 October 2019 / Published: 16 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polar Sea Ice: Detection, Monitoring and Modeling)
Surface temperatures derived from satellite thermal infrared (TIR) data are critical inputs for assessing climate change in polar environments. Sea and ice surface temperature (SST, IST) are commonly determined with split window algorithms that use the brightness temperature from the 11 μm channel (BT11) as the main estimator and the difference between BT11 and the 12 μm channel (BTD11–12) to correct for atmospheric water vapor absorption. An issue with this paradigm in the Arctic maritime environment is the occurrence of high BTD11–12 that is not indicative of atmospheric absorption of BT11 energy. The Composite Arctic Sea Surface Temperature Algorithm (CASSTA) considers three regimes based on BT11 pixel value: seawater, ice, and marginal ice zones. A single channel (BT11) estimator is used for SST and a split window algorithm for IST. Marginal ice zone temperature is determined with a weighted average between the SST and IST. This study replaces the CASSTA split window IST with a single channel (BT11) estimator to reduce errors associated with BTD11–12 in the split window algorithm. The single channel IST returned improved results in the CASSTA dataset with a mean average error for ice and marginal ice zones of 0.142 K and 0.128 K, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; arctic waters; ice surface temperature; sea ice; marginal ice zones; satellite temperature algorithm remote sensing; arctic waters; ice surface temperature; sea ice; marginal ice zones; satellite temperature algorithm
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vincent, R. The Case for a Single Channel Composite Arctic Sea Surface Temperature Algorithm. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 2393.

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