Next Article in Journal
Urban Tomographic Imaging Using Polarimetric SAR Data
Previous Article in Journal
Recent Surface Deformation in the Tianjin Area Revealed by Sentinel-1A Data
Open AccessFeature PaperEditor’s ChoiceArticle

Bathymetry of Northwest Greenland Using “Ocean Melting Greenland” (OMG) High-Resolution Airborne Gravity and Other Data

1
Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
2
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
3
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Earth Institute at Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10027, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(2), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11020131
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology)
Marine-terminating glaciers dominate the evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and its contribution to sea-level rise. Widespread glacier acceleration has been linked to the warming of ocean waters around the periphery of Greenland but a lack of information on the bathymetry of the continental shelf and glacial fjords has limited our ability to understand how subsurface, warm, salty ocean waters of Atlantic origin (AW) reach the glaciers and melt them from below. Here, we employ high-resolution, airborne gravity data (AIRGrav) in combination with multibeam echo sounding (MBES) data, to infer the bathymetry of the coastal areas of Northwest Greenland for NASA’s Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) mission. High-resolution, AIRGrav data acquired on a 2 km spacing, 150 m ground clearance, with 1.5 mGal crossover error, is inverted in three dimensions to map the bathymetry. To constrain the inversion away from MBES data, we compare two methods: one based on the Direct Current (DC) shift of the gravity field (absolute minus observed gravity) and another based on the density of the bedrock. We evaluate and compare the two methods in areas with complete MBES coverage. We find the lowest standard error in bed elevation (±60 m) using the DC shift method. When applied to the entire coast of Northwest Greenland, the three-dimensional inversion reveals a complex network of connected sea bed channels, not known previously, that provide natural and varied pathways for AW to reach the glaciers across the continental shelf. The study demonstrates that the gravity approach offers an efficient and practical alternative to extensive ship mapping in ice-filled waters to obtain information critical to understanding and modeling ice-ocean interaction along ice sheet margins. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; gravity; bathymetry; Greenland; glaciology; ice-ocean interaction; climate change remote sensing; gravity; bathymetry; Greenland; glaciology; ice-ocean interaction; climate change
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

An, L.; Rignot, E.; Millan, R.; Tinto, K.; Willis, J. Bathymetry of Northwest Greenland Using “Ocean Melting Greenland” (OMG) High-Resolution Airborne Gravity and Other Data. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 131.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop