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Sources of China’s Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis Based on the BML Index with Green Growth Accounting

by 1, 1,* and 1,2
1
Economic Department, School of Economics, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
2
Business School, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2014, 6(9), 5983-6004; https://doi.org/10.3390/su6095983
Received: 7 July 2014 / Revised: 18 August 2014 / Accepted: 26 August 2014 / Published: 5 September 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
This study develops a biennial Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index that is used to measure the sources of economic growth by utilizing data envelopment analysis and the directional distance function. Taking restrictions on resources and the environment into account based on the green growth accounting framework; we split economic growth into seven components: technical efficiency change, technological change, labor effect, capital effect, energy effect, output structure effect and environmental regulation effect. Further, we apply the Silverman test and Li-Fan-Ullah nonparametric test in combination with kernel distribution to test for the counterfactual contributions at the provincial level in China from 1998 to 2012. The empirical results show that: (1) technological progress and TFP make positive contributions to economic growth in China, while technical efficiency drags it down; (2) the effect of output structure and CO2 emissions with environmental regulation restrain economic growth in some provinces; and (3) overall, physical capital accumulation is the most important driving force for economic take-off, irrespective of whether the government adopts environmental regulations. View Full-Text
Keywords: economic growth; biennial Malmquist–Luenberger index; data envelopment analysis; green growth accounting framework; counterfactual distribution economic growth; biennial Malmquist–Luenberger index; data envelopment analysis; green growth accounting framework; counterfactual distribution
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MDPI and ACS Style

Du, M.; Wang, B.; Wu, Y. Sources of China’s Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis Based on the BML Index with Green Growth Accounting. Sustainability 2014, 6, 5983-6004. https://doi.org/10.3390/su6095983

AMA Style

Du M, Wang B, Wu Y. Sources of China’s Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis Based on the BML Index with Green Growth Accounting. Sustainability. 2014; 6(9):5983-6004. https://doi.org/10.3390/su6095983

Chicago/Turabian Style

Du, Minzhe; Wang, Bing; Wu, Yanrui. 2014. "Sources of China’s Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis Based on the BML Index with Green Growth Accounting" Sustainability 6, no. 9: 5983-6004. https://doi.org/10.3390/su6095983

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