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Article

Who’s to Act? Perceptions of Intergenerational Obligation and Pro-Environmental Behaviours among Youth

1
Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Institute of Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ricardo García Mira
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1414; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031414
Received: 8 December 2021 / Revised: 17 January 2022 / Accepted: 21 January 2022 / Published: 26 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
“We are all in the same boat” are words heard from young climate activists, suggesting that all generations must engage together in the fight against climate change. However, because of their age and life situation, some young people may feel unable to change the situation and attribute the moral obligation to do so to older generations. Whether such attributions restrict young people from engaging in pro-environmental behaviours remains largely unstudied. To fill this gap, the present study incorporated perceptions of self-efficacy, feelings of external control, and intergenerational obligation (i.e., believing that all generations should act) into the Value–Belief–Norm model. Data from high school (n = 639) and bachelor (n = 1509) students in French-speaking Switzerland showed that perceptions of self-efficacy and intergenerational obligation predicted the probability of engaging in both an actual behaviour (Study 1) and a costly educational commitment (Study 2), while perceiving that the fate of the Earth lies in the hands of powerful others did not. These results suggest that educational programs on climate change should integrate intergenerational components. View Full-Text
Keywords: youth; pro-environmental behaviours; external control; intergenerational obligation; value–belief–norm model youth; pro-environmental behaviours; external control; intergenerational obligation; value–belief–norm model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sarrasin, O.; Crettaz von Roten, F.; Butera, F. Who’s to Act? Perceptions of Intergenerational Obligation and Pro-Environmental Behaviours among Youth. Sustainability 2022, 14, 1414. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031414

AMA Style

Sarrasin O, Crettaz von Roten F, Butera F. Who’s to Act? Perceptions of Intergenerational Obligation and Pro-Environmental Behaviours among Youth. Sustainability. 2022; 14(3):1414. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031414

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sarrasin, Oriane, Fabienne Crettaz von Roten, and Fabrizio Butera. 2022. "Who’s to Act? Perceptions of Intergenerational Obligation and Pro-Environmental Behaviours among Youth" Sustainability 14, no. 3: 1414. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031414

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