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Article

A Case Study on the Assessment of Chemical and Physical Pollution Levels during the Copying Process

1
Research Group on Logistics and Defense Technology Management, General Jonas Žemaitis Military Academy of Lithuania, Silo St. 5A, LT-10322 Vilnius, Lithuania
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Fundamental Sciences Faculty, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Saulėtekio al. 11, LT-10223 Vilnius, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Živilė Stankevičiūtė
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1287; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031287
Received: 2 December 2021 / Revised: 16 January 2022 / Accepted: 17 January 2022 / Published: 24 January 2022
In accordance with sustainable development goals (SDG’s), urgent action should be taken to make the societal and natural environments better for human beings. People spend most of their time indoors, therefore growing attention is devoted to address indoor air pollution. When the sources of anthropogenic indoor air pollution (copiers, laser printers) are operated indoors, then chemical and physical indoor air pollution may be higher than air pollution outdoors. Ozone, aerosol particles and volatile organic compounds are the result of pollution caused by copiers and printers. The research was carried out in a copying room by recording chemical (ozone and aerosol particles) and physical (noise) environmental pollution. To determine instantaneous ozone concentrations in the copying room, an ozone analyzer O3 41M was used, while to evaluate the effect of ozone on the ambient air of the copying room, passive samplers were used. To determine the number and concentration of aerosol particles in the ambient air of the office, a particle counter AZ-5 was used. In addition, a DrDAQ data logger was used to measure noise emitted by the copier and ambient temperature as well as relative air humidity. It was found that the distribution of ozone and aerosol particles in the copying room was mostly determined by the copying intensity. The maximum concentration of ozone and aerosol particles was determined during automatic copying (91–120 copies/min). View Full-Text
Keywords: chemical and physical pollution; technological process; copying intensity; ozone concentration; aerosol particles; noise; sustainable development chemical and physical pollution; technological process; copying intensity; ozone concentration; aerosol particles; noise; sustainable development
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vasiliauskienė, V.; Vasilis Vasiliauskas, A. A Case Study on the Assessment of Chemical and Physical Pollution Levels during the Copying Process. Sustainability 2022, 14, 1287. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031287

AMA Style

Vasiliauskienė V, Vasilis Vasiliauskas A. A Case Study on the Assessment of Chemical and Physical Pollution Levels during the Copying Process. Sustainability. 2022; 14(3):1287. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031287

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vasiliauskienė, Vaida, and Aidas Vasilis Vasiliauskas. 2022. "A Case Study on the Assessment of Chemical and Physical Pollution Levels during the Copying Process" Sustainability 14, no. 3: 1287. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031287

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