Next Article in Journal
Social Innovation: Field Analysis and Gaps for Future Research
Previous Article in Journal
Developing and Applying Circularity Indicators for the Electrical and Electronic Sector: A Product Lifecycle Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
Examining Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccine Tourism for International Tourists
Article

The Impacts of Tourism Stays on Residents’ Self-Reported Health: A Pan-European Analysis on the Role of Age and Urbanization Level

1
Erasmus Centre for Urban, Port and Transport Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Geography, Rovira i Virgili University, 43480 Vila-seca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mercedes Rodríguez-Fernández, Yvon Bryan and Eva M. Sánchez-Teba
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1157; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031157
Received: 17 December 2021 / Revised: 17 January 2022 / Accepted: 17 January 2022 / Published: 20 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Collection Sustainable Health Tourism)
Understanding the impacts of tourism on the quality of life of residents is a priority for the sustainable tourism agenda, and is especially relevant to the COVID-19 recovery period. However, the evidence is poor, and it is not clear whether the outcomes vary among sociodemographic groups. This study fills this gap by proposing a pan-European analysis of the effects of tourism stays per 1000 residents (as a measure of tourism pressure) on self-perceived health at a regional level, based on data from Eurostat, the EU-SILC (European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions survey), and the LFS (Labor Force Survey). Multilevel models with random effects were used, including three levels: region, time, and region–time. Results show that tourism pressure may benefit self-reported health but only among residents aged over 50 years old living in rural contexts, or over 65 living in low density urban areas. As for younger groups (under 50) living in high density cities, tourism is longitudinally associated with worsened self-reported health. These results, which are supported by instrumental-variable estimations, suggest that urban residents and younger groups do not benefit from tourism. This might be due to a number of side effects related to increased living costs, precarious labour, and conflicts related to public space. Therefore, our findings challenge the narrative that urban tourism universally improves residents’ quality of life. Considering the global urgency of creating healthier and more equitable post-COVID-19 cities and societies, tourism should be considered together with health and equity dimensions. View Full-Text
Keywords: tourism; health; sustainability; wellbeing; Europe; EU-SILC; multilevel model tourism; health; sustainability; wellbeing; Europe; EU-SILC; multilevel model
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bornioli, A.; Vermeulen, S.J.; van Haaren, J.; Valente, R.; Mingardo, G. The Impacts of Tourism Stays on Residents’ Self-Reported Health: A Pan-European Analysis on the Role of Age and Urbanization Level. Sustainability 2022, 14, 1157. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031157

AMA Style

Bornioli A, Vermeulen SJ, van Haaren J, Valente R, Mingardo G. The Impacts of Tourism Stays on Residents’ Self-Reported Health: A Pan-European Analysis on the Role of Age and Urbanization Level. Sustainability. 2022; 14(3):1157. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031157

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bornioli, Anna, Susan J. Vermeulen, Jeroen van Haaren, Riccardo Valente, and Giuliano Mingardo. 2022. "The Impacts of Tourism Stays on Residents’ Self-Reported Health: A Pan-European Analysis on the Role of Age and Urbanization Level" Sustainability 14, no. 3: 1157. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031157

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop