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Article

Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Qatar Electricity Demand and Load Forecasting: Preparedness of Distribution Networks for Emerging Situations

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IPP Contracts and Agreements Engineer, Qatar General Electricity and Water Corporation (KAHRAMAA), Doha P.O. Box 41, Qatar
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Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering, Qatar University, Doha P.O. Box 2713, Qatar
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Qatar Transportation and Traffic Safety Center, College of Engineering, Qatar University, Doha P.O. Box 2713, Qatar
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Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, Qatar University, Doha P.O. Box 2713, Qatar
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sebastian Saniuk, Tomasz Rokicki and Dariusz Milewski
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9316; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159316
Received: 5 June 2022 / Revised: 20 July 2022 / Accepted: 24 July 2022 / Published: 29 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic and Social Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic)
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought several global challenges, one of which is meeting the electricity demand. Millions of people are confined to their homes, in each of which a reliable electricity supply is needed, to support teleworking, e-commerce, and electrical appliances such as HVAC, lighting, fridges, water heaters, etc. Furthermore, electricity is also required to operate medical equipment in hospitals and perhaps temporary quarantine hospitals/shelters. Electricity demand forecasting is a crucial input into decision-making for electricity providers. Without an accurate forecast of electricity demand, over-capacity or shortages in the power supply may result in high costs, network bottlenecks, and instability. Electricity demand can be divided, typically, into two sectors: domestic and industrial. This paper discusses the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic on Qatar’s electricity demand and forecasting. It is noted that students’ and employees’ attendance are the restrictions with the highest impact on electricity demand. There was an increase of nearly 28% in the domestic peak due to the attendance of 30% of school students. Furthermore, in this study, historical data on Qatar’s electricity demand, population, and GDP were collected, along with information on COVID-19 restrictions. Statistical analysis was used to unfold the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results and findings will help decision-makers and planners manage future electricity demand, and support distribution networks’ preparedness for emerging situations. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic; Qatar electricity demand; forecasting; electricity meters; distribution networks; emerging situations COVID-19 pandemic; Qatar electricity demand; forecasting; electricity meters; distribution networks; emerging situations
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MDPI and ACS Style

El-Hafez, O.J.; ElMekkawy, T.Y.; Kharbeche, M.; Massoud, A. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Qatar Electricity Demand and Load Forecasting: Preparedness of Distribution Networks for Emerging Situations. Sustainability 2022, 14, 9316. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159316

AMA Style

El-Hafez OJ, ElMekkawy TY, Kharbeche M, Massoud A. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Qatar Electricity Demand and Load Forecasting: Preparedness of Distribution Networks for Emerging Situations. Sustainability. 2022; 14(15):9316. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159316

Chicago/Turabian Style

El-Hafez, Omar Jouma, Tarek Y. ElMekkawy, Mohamed Kharbeche, and Ahmed Massoud. 2022. "Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Qatar Electricity Demand and Load Forecasting: Preparedness of Distribution Networks for Emerging Situations" Sustainability 14, no. 15: 9316. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159316

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