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Article

From Evidence to Design Solution—On How to Handle Evidence in the Design Process of Sustainable, Accessible and Health-Promoting Landscapes

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Section for Landscape Architecture and Planning, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management (IGN), Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
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Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
3
Center for Healthy Cities, Institute for China Sustainable Urbanization, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100085, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Helena Nordh, Piotr Prus and Katinka H. Evensen
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3249; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063249
Received: 3 December 2020 / Revised: 8 March 2021 / Accepted: 11 March 2021 / Published: 16 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Architecture Design to Promote Well-Being)
The work of landscape architects can contribute to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the associated ‘Leave no one behind’ agenda by creating accessible and health-promoting green spaces (especially goals 3, 10 and 11). To ensure that the design of green space delivers accessibility and intended health outcomes, an evidence-based design process is recommended. This is a challenge, since many landscape architects are not trained in evidence-based design, and leading scholars have called for methods that can help landscape architects work in an evidence-based manner. This paper examines the implementation of a process model for evidence-based health design in landscape architecture. The model comprises four steps: ‘evidence collection’, ‘programming’, ‘designing’, and ‘evaluation’. The paper aims to demonstrate how the programming step can be implemented in the design of a health-promoting nature trail that is to offer people with mobility disabilities improved mental, physical and social health. We demonstrate how the programming step systematizes evidence into design criteria (evidence-based goals) and design solutions (how the design criteria are to be solved in the design). The results of the study are presented as a design ‘Program’, which we hope can serve as an example for landscape architects of how evidence can be translated into design. View Full-Text
Keywords: accessibility; design process; design research; evidence-based health design; green spaces; human health; landscape architecture; leave no one behind; user-centred design accessibility; design process; design research; evidence-based health design; green spaces; human health; landscape architecture; leave no one behind; user-centred design
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gramkow, M.C.; Sidenius, U.; Zhang, G.; Stigsdotter, U.K. From Evidence to Design Solution—On How to Handle Evidence in the Design Process of Sustainable, Accessible and Health-Promoting Landscapes. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3249. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063249

AMA Style

Gramkow MC, Sidenius U, Zhang G, Stigsdotter UK. From Evidence to Design Solution—On How to Handle Evidence in the Design Process of Sustainable, Accessible and Health-Promoting Landscapes. Sustainability. 2021; 13(6):3249. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063249

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gramkow, Marie C., Ulrik Sidenius, Gaochao Zhang, and Ulrika K. Stigsdotter 2021. "From Evidence to Design Solution—On How to Handle Evidence in the Design Process of Sustainable, Accessible and Health-Promoting Landscapes" Sustainability 13, no. 6: 3249. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063249

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