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Article

The Crossroads of Ecotourism Dependency, Food Security and a Global Pandemic in Galápagos, Ecuador

Department of History, Humanities & International Studies, Hawaii Pacific University, 1 Aloha Drive, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
Academic Editor: Stephen Royle
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13094; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313094
Received: 8 October 2021 / Revised: 2 November 2021 / Accepted: 9 November 2021 / Published: 26 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Island Tourism)
International esteem for Galápagos’ natural wonders and the democratization of travel have contributed to a 300% increase in annual tourist entries to the archipelago from 2000 (68,989) to 2018 (275,817). The attendant spike in tourism-related anthropogenic impact coupled with deficient infrastructure development has put the archipelago’s natural capital and carrying capacity at risk. The complex nature of Galápagos’ food insecurity is linked to the archipelago’s geographic isolation, its diminishing agricultural workforce, international tourists’ demand for recognizable food, and a lack of investment in sustainable and innovative agricultural futures. Food security is key to the long-term well-being of Galapagueños, who sustain Galápagos’ tourism industry. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed the vulnerability of human systems in Galápagos, especially the fragility of Galápagos’ ecotourism dependency. Galapagueños’ struggle to endure the tourism sector’s slow rebound following the 2020 travel restrictions points to an urgent need to implement food security measures as an indispensable component of the archipelago’s long-term sustainability plan. This article presents ethnographic data to discuss the tourism sector’s impact on local food systems, Galapagueños’ right to food sovereignty, efforts to increase agricultural production, and why strengthening institutional partnerships is vital to Galápagos’ food self-sufficiency. View Full-Text
Keywords: Galapagos; tourism; ecotourism; sustainability; food security; food self-sufficiency; food sovereignty; complexity Galapagos; tourism; ecotourism; sustainability; food security; food self-sufficiency; food sovereignty; complexity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Burke, A. The Crossroads of Ecotourism Dependency, Food Security and a Global Pandemic in Galápagos, Ecuador. Sustainability 2021, 13, 13094. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313094

AMA Style

Burke A. The Crossroads of Ecotourism Dependency, Food Security and a Global Pandemic in Galápagos, Ecuador. Sustainability. 2021; 13(23):13094. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313094

Chicago/Turabian Style

Burke, Adam. 2021. "The Crossroads of Ecotourism Dependency, Food Security and a Global Pandemic in Galápagos, Ecuador" Sustainability 13, no. 23: 13094. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313094

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