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Review

Thinking Like a Mountain: Exploring the Potential of Relational Approaches for Transformative Nature Conservation

1
Institute of Asian Research, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1, Canada
2
Plateau Perspectives, Surrey, BC V4A 4S2, Canada
3
Department of Asian and North African Studies, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Dorsoduro 3246, 30123 Venice, Italy
4
ICCA Consortium, 1272 Genolier, Switzerland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Panayiotis Dimitrakopoulos
Sustainability 2021, 13(22), 12884; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212884
Received: 14 October 2021 / Revised: 10 November 2021 / Accepted: 17 November 2021 / Published: 21 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Governance and Management of Protected and Conserved Areas)
Building on a review of current mainstream paradigms of nature conservation, the essence of transformations necessary for effective and lasting change are presented—namely, convivial solutions (or ‘living with others’), in which relationality and an appreciation of our interdependencies are central, in contrast to life-diminishing models of individualism and materialism/secularism. We offer several areas for improvement centred on regenerative solutions, moving beyond conventional environmental protection or biophysical restoration and focusing instead on critical multidimensional relationships—amongst people and between people and the rest of nature. We focus, in particular, on the potential of people’s values and worldviews to inform morality (guiding principles and/or beliefs about right and wrong) and ethics (societal rules defining acceptable behaviour), which alone can nurture the just transformations needed for nature conservation and sustainability at all scales. Finally, we systematize the potential of regenerative solutions against a backdrop of relational approaches in sustainability sciences. In so doing, we contribute to current endeavours of the conservation community for more inclusive conservation, expanding beyond economic valuations of nature and protected areas to include more holistic models of governance that are premised on relationally-oriented value systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: people; nature; biodiversity; conservation; regeneration; relationships; value systems; just transformations; human rights-based approaches; Indigenous Peoples and local communities people; nature; biodiversity; conservation; regeneration; relationships; value systems; just transformations; human rights-based approaches; Indigenous Peoples and local communities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Foggin, J.M.; Brombal, D.; Razmkhah, A. Thinking Like a Mountain: Exploring the Potential of Relational Approaches for Transformative Nature Conservation. Sustainability 2021, 13, 12884. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212884

AMA Style

Foggin JM, Brombal D, Razmkhah A. Thinking Like a Mountain: Exploring the Potential of Relational Approaches for Transformative Nature Conservation. Sustainability. 2021; 13(22):12884. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212884

Chicago/Turabian Style

Foggin, J. Marc, Daniele Brombal, and Ali Razmkhah. 2021. "Thinking Like a Mountain: Exploring the Potential of Relational Approaches for Transformative Nature Conservation" Sustainability 13, no. 22: 12884. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212884

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