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Impacts of COVID-19 on the Aquatic Environment and Implications on Aquatic Food Production

1
Department of Aquaculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Malaysia
2
International Institute of Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Port Dickson 71050, Malaysia
3
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Malaysia
4
Department of Environment, Faculty of Forestry and Environment, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Malaysia
5
Laboratory of Aquatic Animal Health and Therapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Samuel Asumadu-Sarkodie
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11281; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011281
Received: 20 August 2021 / Revised: 26 September 2021 / Accepted: 3 October 2021 / Published: 13 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of COVID-19 on the Environment, Energy and Economics)
The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), resulted in ecological changes of aquatic ecosystems, affected the aquatic food supply chain, and disrupted the socio-economy of global populations. Due to reduced human activities during the pandemic, the aquatic environment was reported to improve its water quality, wild fishery stocks, and biodiversity. However, the sudden surge of plastics and biomedical wastes during the COVID-19 pandemic masked the positive impacts and increased the risks of aquatic pollution, especially microplastics, pharmaceuticals, and disinfectants. The transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from wastewater treatment plants to natural water bodies could have serious impacts on the environment and human health, especially in developing countries with poor waste treatment facilities. The presence and persistence of SARS-CoV-2 in human excreta, wastewaters, and sludge and its transmission to aquatic ecosystems could have negative impacts on fisheries and aquaculture industries, which have direct implications on food safety and security. COVID-19 pandemic-related environmental pollution showed a high risk to aquatic food security and human health. This paper reviews the impacts of COVID-19, both positive and negative, and assesses the causes and consequences of anthropogenic activities that can be managed through effective regulation and management of eco-resources for the revival of biodiversity, ecosystem health, and sustainable aquatic food production. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; aquatic environment; risks; aquatic foods; fisheries; aquaculture COVID-19; aquatic environment; risks; aquatic foods; fisheries; aquaculture
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yusoff, F.M.; Abdullah, A.F.; Aris, A.Z.; Umi, W.A.D. Impacts of COVID-19 on the Aquatic Environment and Implications on Aquatic Food Production. Sustainability 2021, 13, 11281. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011281

AMA Style

Yusoff FM, Abdullah AF, Aris AZ, Umi WAD. Impacts of COVID-19 on the Aquatic Environment and Implications on Aquatic Food Production. Sustainability. 2021; 13(20):11281. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011281

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yusoff, Fatimah M., Ahmad F. Abdullah, Ahmad Z. Aris, and Wahidah A.D. Umi 2021. "Impacts of COVID-19 on the Aquatic Environment and Implications on Aquatic Food Production" Sustainability 13, no. 20: 11281. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011281

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