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Open AccessCommunication

Predicting Post-Fire Tree Mortality in a Temperate Pine Forest, Korea

1
Division of Forest Restoration and Resource Management, National Institute of Forest Science, Seoul 02455, Korea
2
Group of Research in Ecology-MRC Abitibi (GREMA), Forest Research Institute, University of Québec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Amos Campus, Amos, QC J9T 2L8, Canada
3
Center for Forest Research, University of Québec in Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada
4
Division of Forest Welfare Statistics, Korea Forest Welfare Institute, Daejeon 35236, Korea
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Temperate Middle Part Plant Conservation Team, Sejong National Arboretum, Sejong 30106, Korea
6
Restoration Ecology Group, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), 901 83 Umeå, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020569
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 14 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 9 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainability, Biodiversity and Conservation)
Warmer and drier conditions in temperate regions are increasing the length of the wildfire season. Given the greater fire frequency and extent of burned areas under climate warming, greater focus has been placed on predicting post-fire tree mortality as a crucial component of sustainable forest management. This study evaluates the potential of logistic regression models to predict post-fire tree mortality in Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora) stands, and we propose novel means of evaluating bark injury. In the Samcheok region of Korea, we measured topography (elevation, slope, and aspect), tree characteristics (tree/crown height and diameter at breast height (DBH)), and bark injuries (bark scorch height/proportion/index) at three sites subjected to a surface fire. We determined tree status (dead or live) over three years after the initial fire. The bark scorch index (BSI) produced the best univariate model, and by combining this index with the DBH produced the highest predictive capacity in multiple logistic regression models. A three-variable model (BSI, DBH, and slope) enhanced this predictive capacity to 87%. Our logistic regression analysis accurately predicted tree mortality three years post fire. Our three-variable model provides a useful and convenient decision-making tool for land managers to optimize salvage harvesting of post-fire stands. View Full-Text
Keywords: bark scorch index (BSI); forest ecosystems; natural disturbances; sustainable management; tree mortality; logistic regression; Pinus densiflora; wildfire bark scorch index (BSI); forest ecosystems; natural disturbances; sustainable management; tree mortality; logistic regression; Pinus densiflora; wildfire
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kwon, S.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.; Kang, W.; Park, K.-H.; Kim, C.-B.; Girona, M.M. Predicting Post-Fire Tree Mortality in a Temperate Pine Forest, Korea. Sustainability 2021, 13, 569. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020569

AMA Style

Kwon S, Kim S, Kim J, Kang W, Park K-H, Kim C-B, Girona MM. Predicting Post-Fire Tree Mortality in a Temperate Pine Forest, Korea. Sustainability. 2021; 13(2):569. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020569

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kwon, Semyung; Kim, Sanghyun; Kim, Jeonghwan; Kang, Wonseok; Park, Ki-Hyung; Kim, Chan-Beom; Girona, Miguel M. 2021. "Predicting Post-Fire Tree Mortality in a Temperate Pine Forest, Korea" Sustainability 13, no. 2: 569. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020569

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