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Article

A Sustainable and Global Health Perspective of the Dietary Pattern of French Population during the 1998–2015 Period from INCA Surveys

1
INRAE, UNH, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, CRNH Auvergne, Université Clermont Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
2
European Childhood Obesity Group, Clermont Auvergne University, EA 3533, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), CRNH Auvergne, 63178 Clermont-Ferrand, France
3
Service de Santé Publique, CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS-UMR 6602, Institut Pascal, 63178 Clermont-Ferrand, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nazimah Hamid and Kevin Kantono
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7433; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137433
Received: 26 May 2021 / Revised: 20 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 2 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Byproduct Valorisation and Consumer Behaviour)
In France, the evolution of dietary pattern relative to sustainability and global health remains insufficiently studied. The objective of this study was to assess dietary changes during 1998–2015 through three generic metrics potentially related to sustainability. Food consumption data were collected from three French National Individual Study of Food Consumption surveys (INCA) for children (0–17 years) and adults (18–79 years) representative of the French population. The consumed foods were converted into plant (metric 1) and non-ultra-processed (UPF, metric 2) calories, and analyzed in meeting dietary recommended intakes (metric 3). French children and adults consumed high levels of animal and UPF calories, and nutrient deficiencies were observed in adults from the 2015 survey, e.g., fiber, EPA, DHA, magnesium, retinol, and vitamin C. In children, UPF daily calories increased from 42.8 to 45.5% and decreased in adults from 39.2 to 35.0%. In children and adults, diet revegetation was observed. While the level of physical activity decreased, overweight, obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence increased in French adults. The French dietary pattern is not sustainable for global health unless public health policy is reinforced, with at least a twofold decrease in animal and UPF calories and improved food diversity. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability; global health; French dietary pattern; animal products; ultra-processed foods; nutritional needs sustainability; global health; French dietary pattern; animal products; ultra-processed foods; nutritional needs
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fardet, A.; Thivel, D.; Gerbaud, L.; Rock, E. A Sustainable and Global Health Perspective of the Dietary Pattern of French Population during the 1998–2015 Period from INCA Surveys. Sustainability 2021, 13, 7433. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137433

AMA Style

Fardet A, Thivel D, Gerbaud L, Rock E. A Sustainable and Global Health Perspective of the Dietary Pattern of French Population during the 1998–2015 Period from INCA Surveys. Sustainability. 2021; 13(13):7433. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137433

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fardet, Anthony, David Thivel, Laurent Gerbaud, and Edmond Rock. 2021. "A Sustainable and Global Health Perspective of the Dietary Pattern of French Population during the 1998–2015 Period from INCA Surveys" Sustainability 13, no. 13: 7433. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137433

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