Next Article in Journal
Cloud Manufacturing, Internet of Things-Assisted Manufacturing and 3D Printing Technology: Reliable Tools for Sustainable Construction
Previous Article in Journal
The Effects of Bike Desks in Formal Education Classroom-Based Physical Activity: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Challenges in Using Earth Observation (EO) Data to Support Environmental Management in Brazil
Article

Implications for Tracking SDG Indicator Metrics with Gridded Population Data

1
Center for International Earth Science Information Network, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA
2
Department of Geography and Geosciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
3
WorldPop, School of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
4
International Research Institute for Climate and Society, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA
5
Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, 2502 KC The Hague, The Netherlands
6
ImageCat, Inc., Long Beach, CA 90802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Stephen Morse, Richard Murphy and Ana Andries
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7329; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137329
Received: 12 May 2021 / Revised: 15 June 2021 / Accepted: 21 June 2021 / Published: 30 June 2021
Achieving the seventeen United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires accurate, consistent, and accessible population data. Yet many low- and middle-income countries lack reliable or recent census data at the sufficiently fine spatial scales needed to monitor SDG progress. While the increasing abundance of Earth observation-derived gridded population products provides analysis-ready population estimates, end users lack clear use criteria to track SDGs indicators. In fact, recent comparisons of gridded population products identify wide variation across gridded population products. Here we present three case studies to illuminate how gridded population datasets compare in measuring and monitoring SDGs to advance the “fitness for use” guidance. Our focus is on SDG 11.5, which aims to reduce the number of people impacted by disasters. We use five gridded population datasets to measure and map hazard exposure for three case studies: the 2015 earthquake in Nepal; Cyclone Idai in Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe (MMZ) in 2019; and flash flood susceptibility in Ecuador. First, we map and quantify geographic patterns of agreement/disagreement across gridded population products for Nepal, MMZ, and Ecuador, including delineating urban and rural populations estimates. Second, we quantify the populations exposed to each hazard. Across hazards and geographic contexts, there were marked differences in population estimates across the gridded population datasets. As such, it is key that researchers, practitioners, and end users utilize multiple gridded population datasets—an ensemble approach—to capture uncertainty and/or provide range estimates when using gridded population products to track SDG indicators. To this end, we made available code and globally comprehensive datasets that allows for the intercomparison of gridded population products. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sustainable Development Goals; hazards; Earth observations; remote sensing; demography; urbanization; gridded population Sustainable Development Goals; hazards; Earth observations; remote sensing; demography; urbanization; gridded population
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tuholske, C.; Gaughan, A.E.; Sorichetta, A.; de Sherbinin, A.; Bucherie, A.; Hultquist, C.; Stevens, F.; Kruczkiewicz, A.; Huyck, C.; Yetman, G. Implications for Tracking SDG Indicator Metrics with Gridded Population Data. Sustainability 2021, 13, 7329. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137329

AMA Style

Tuholske C, Gaughan AE, Sorichetta A, de Sherbinin A, Bucherie A, Hultquist C, Stevens F, Kruczkiewicz A, Huyck C, Yetman G. Implications for Tracking SDG Indicator Metrics with Gridded Population Data. Sustainability. 2021; 13(13):7329. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137329

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tuholske, Cascade, Andrea E. Gaughan, Alessandro Sorichetta, Alex de Sherbinin, Agathe Bucherie, Carolynne Hultquist, Forrest Stevens, Andrew Kruczkiewicz, Charles Huyck, and Greg Yetman. 2021. "Implications for Tracking SDG Indicator Metrics with Gridded Population Data" Sustainability 13, no. 13: 7329. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137329

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop