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Article

Manure Flushing vs. Scraping in Dairy Freestall Lanes Reduces Gaseous Emissions

1
Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616-8521, USA
2
Air Quality Research Center, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616-8521, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Rajeev Bhat
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5363; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105363
Received: 8 April 2021 / Revised: 6 May 2021 / Accepted: 6 May 2021 / Published: 11 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Sector: Opportunities and Sustainability Challenges)
The objective of the present study was to mitigate ammonia (NH3), greenhouse gases (GHGs), and other air pollutants from lactating dairy cattle waste using different freestall management techniques. For the present study, cows were housed in an environmental chamber from which waste was removed by either flushing or scraping at two different frequencies. The four treatments used were (1) flushing three times a day (F3), (2) flushing six times a day (F6), (3) scraping three times a day (S3), and (4) scraping six times a day (S6). Flushing freestall lanes to remove manure while cows are out of the barn during milking is an industry standard in California. Gas emissions were measured with a mobile agricultural air quality lab connected to the environmental chamber. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions were decreased (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) in the flushing vs. scraping treatments, respectively. Scraping increased NH3 emissions by 175 and 152% for S3 and S6, respectively vs. F3. Ethanol (EtOH) emissions were increased (p < 0.001) when the frequency of either scraping or flushing was increased from 3 to 6 times but were similar between scraping and flushing treatments. Methane emissions for the F3 vs. other treatments, were decreased (p < 0.001). Removal of dairy manure by scraping has the potential to increase gaseous emissions such as NH3 and GHGs. View Full-Text
Keywords: ammonia emissions; dairy cow; flushing; freestall barn; scraping ammonia emissions; dairy cow; flushing; freestall barn; scraping
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ross, E.G.; Peterson, C.B.; Zhao, Y.; Pan, Y.; Mitloehner, F.M. Manure Flushing vs. Scraping in Dairy Freestall Lanes Reduces Gaseous Emissions. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5363. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105363

AMA Style

Ross EG, Peterson CB, Zhao Y, Pan Y, Mitloehner FM. Manure Flushing vs. Scraping in Dairy Freestall Lanes Reduces Gaseous Emissions. Sustainability. 2021; 13(10):5363. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105363

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ross, Elizabeth G., Carlyn B. Peterson, Yongjing Zhao, Yuee Pan, and Frank M. Mitloehner. 2021. "Manure Flushing vs. Scraping in Dairy Freestall Lanes Reduces Gaseous Emissions" Sustainability 13, no. 10: 5363. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105363

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