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Article

Perceptions of Post-Disaster Housing Safety in Future Typhoons and Earthquakes

Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
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Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3837; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093837
Received: 8 March 2020 / Revised: 23 April 2020 / Accepted: 5 May 2020 / Published: 8 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Sheltering and Housing Displaced Populations)
How residents perceive housing safety affects how structures are designed, built, and maintained. This study assesses the perceptions of housing safety through a survey of over 450 individuals in communities that received post-disaster housing reconstruction assistance following 2013’s Typhoon Yolanda, and that were potentially vulnerable to earthquakes. We analyzed how housing design factors, post-disaster program elements, personal characteristics, and hazard type and exposure influenced safety perceptions. Overall, individuals were most concerned with the safety of their roofs during hazard events and perceived their houses would be less safe in a future typhoon than a future earthquake. Housing material significantly impacted safety perceptions, with individuals in wood houses perceiving their houses to be the least safe. Individuals living in areas more exposed to hazards also perceived their houses to be less safe. Being relocated after the typhoon, witnessing good or bad practices during reconstruction, and prior disaster experience also significantly influenced perceptions of housing safety. These results are used to make recommendations on how implementing organizations can most beneficially intervene with program factors to improve local understanding of housing safety. View Full-Text
Keywords: housing safety; housing characteristics; post-disaster housing; shelter; risk perceptions; typhoon Yolanda; earthquakes; multi-hazard housing safety; housing characteristics; post-disaster housing; shelter; risk perceptions; typhoon Yolanda; earthquakes; multi-hazard
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MDPI and ACS Style

Venable, C.; Javernick-Will, A.; Liel, A.B. Perceptions of Post-Disaster Housing Safety in Future Typhoons and Earthquakes. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3837. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093837

AMA Style

Venable C, Javernick-Will A, Liel AB. Perceptions of Post-Disaster Housing Safety in Future Typhoons and Earthquakes. Sustainability. 2020; 12(9):3837. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093837

Chicago/Turabian Style

Venable, Casie, Amy Javernick-Will, and Abbie B. Liel 2020. "Perceptions of Post-Disaster Housing Safety in Future Typhoons and Earthquakes" Sustainability 12, no. 9: 3837. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093837

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