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Open AccessArticle

Education and Disaster Vulnerability in Southeast Asia: Evidence and Policy Implications

1
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Telegrafenberg A56, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
2
Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital, Vienna Institute of Demography, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Welthandelsplatz 2, 1020 Vienna, Austria
3
Development and humanitarian affairs professional, Rue de l’Arbre Benit 70, 1050 Ixelles, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1401; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041401 (registering DOI)
Received: 17 December 2019 / Revised: 20 January 2020 / Accepted: 4 February 2020 / Published: 14 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Education and Sustainable Development)
This article summarizes the growing theoretical and empirical literature on the impact of education on disaster vulnerability with a focus on Southeast Asia. Education and learning can take place in different environments in more or less formalized ways. They can influence disaster vulnerability as the capacity to anticipate, cope with, resist, and recover from natural hazard in direct and indirect ways. Directly, through education and learning, individuals acquire knowledge, abilities, skills and perceptions that allow them to effectively prepare for and cope with the consequences of disaster shocks. Indirectly, education gives individuals and households access to material, informational and social resources, which can help reducing disaster vulnerability. We highlight central concepts and terminologies and discuss the different theoretical mechanisms through which education may have an impact. Supportive empirical evidence is presented and discussed with a particular focus on the role of inclusiveness in education and challenges in achieving universal access to high-quality education. Based on situation analysis and best practice cases, policy implications are derived that can inform the design and implementation of education and learning-based disaster risk reduction efforts in the region. View Full-Text
Keywords: education; disaster vulnerability; disaster risk reduction; Southeast Asia; review; policy implications education; disaster vulnerability; disaster risk reduction; Southeast Asia; review; policy implications
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Hoffmann, R.; Blecha, D. Education and Disaster Vulnerability in Southeast Asia: Evidence and Policy Implications. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1401.

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