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Article

Women Farmers and Agricultural Innovation: Marital Status and Normative Expectations in Rural Ethiopia

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Gender & Social Inclusion, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, CIMMYT Int., Texcoco 56237, Mexico
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Knowledge, Technology and Innovation Group, Wageningen University and Research, 6700 Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Independent Researcher, 48145 Münster, Germany
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International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, CIMMYT Int., Texcoco 56237, Mexico
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Independent Researcher, 1176 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9847; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239847
Received: 28 September 2020 / Revised: 1 November 2020 / Accepted: 1 November 2020 / Published: 25 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancing Gender Equality in Rural Areas of Developing Countries)
Sustainable agricultural development depends on female and male smallholders being effective farmers. This includes the ability to access or control resources and make the best decisions possible agro-ecologically, economically, and socially. Traditionally, gendered studies on innovation practice focus on female- versus male-headed households. In this paper, we focus on married women in acknowledged male-headed households and women heading their own households to examine how marital status influences women’s capacity to innovate in their rural livelihoods. Using data from eight community case studies in Ethiopia, we used variable-oriented and contextualized case-oriented analysis to understand factors which promote or constrain women’s innovative capacities. We use Kabeer’s Resources–Agency–Achievements framework to structure our findings. Single women are more likely to own land and experience control over their production decisions and expenditures than married women, but engage in considerable struggle to obtain resources that should be theirs according to the law. Even when land is secured, customary norms often hamper women’s effective use of land and their ability to innovate. Still, some single women do succeed. Married women can innovate successfully provided they are in a collaborative relationship with their husbands. Finally, we find that gender-based violence limits women’s achievements. The article concludes with recommendations. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable development; women; marital status; gender norms; capacity to innovate; wheat; maize; Ethiopia sustainable development; women; marital status; gender norms; capacity to innovate; wheat; maize; Ethiopia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Badstue, L.; Petesch, P.; Farnworth, C.R.; Roeven, L.; Hailemariam, M. Women Farmers and Agricultural Innovation: Marital Status and Normative Expectations in Rural Ethiopia. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9847. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239847

AMA Style

Badstue L, Petesch P, Farnworth CR, Roeven L, Hailemariam M. Women Farmers and Agricultural Innovation: Marital Status and Normative Expectations in Rural Ethiopia. Sustainability. 2020; 12(23):9847. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239847

Chicago/Turabian Style

Badstue, Lone, Patti Petesch, Cathy R. Farnworth, Lara Roeven, and Mahlet Hailemariam. 2020. "Women Farmers and Agricultural Innovation: Marital Status and Normative Expectations in Rural Ethiopia" Sustainability 12, no. 23: 9847. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239847

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