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Review

A DPSIR Assessment on Ecosystem Services Challenges in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: Coping with the Impacts of Sand Mining

1
Department for Water, Environment, Civil Engineering and Safety, University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, D-39114 Magdeburg, Germany
2
Institute for the Environmental Science, Engineering and Management, Industrial University of Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9323; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229323
Received: 15 October 2020 / Revised: 4 November 2020 / Accepted: 6 November 2020 / Published: 10 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecosystem Services for Sustainable Governance)
River sand mining has been a concerning problem for the southern Asian developing nations. The rampant growth of urbanisation in developing countries has led to an extensive need for and consumption of sand. The Mekong River and its delta are an essential part of southern Vietnam, and also a global biodiversity hub that is currently being exhausted by intensive sand mining. The understanding of the cause–effect of the sand mining over the Mekong delta region and river, from a systems-thinking perspective, is lacking, not only with Vietnam but also with other countries along the Mekong River. The DPSIR framework (Driver–Pressure–State–Impact–Response) is a useful tool to assess and describe the cause–effect within an ecosystem to aid in a better systems-thinking approach for stakeholders, policy makers, and governance managers to draft response measures. This study used the DPSIR framework to assess the different effects of sand mining on the ecosystem services and human well-being in the Mekong River and delta region of Vietnam. Rapid population growth, urbanisation, and infrastructure development needs remain as primary drivers for the sand consumption. The DPSIR study showed a holistic view of several interlinked pressures and state changes in Vietnam’s Mekong, along with some potential responses, to form systematic, sustainable approaches for mitigating and adapting the impacts caused by extensive river sand mining. View Full-Text
Keywords: DPSIR framework assessment; sand mining; Mekong delta; estuarine ecosystem services; sustainable consumption; environmental governance DPSIR framework assessment; sand mining; Mekong delta; estuarine ecosystem services; sustainable consumption; environmental governance
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MDPI and ACS Style

S., N.A.; Hung Anh, L.; Schneider, P. A DPSIR Assessment on Ecosystem Services Challenges in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: Coping with the Impacts of Sand Mining. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9323. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229323

AMA Style

S. NA, Hung Anh L, Schneider P. A DPSIR Assessment on Ecosystem Services Challenges in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: Coping with the Impacts of Sand Mining. Sustainability. 2020; 12(22):9323. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229323

Chicago/Turabian Style

S., Naveedh A., Le Hung Anh, and Petra Schneider. 2020. "A DPSIR Assessment on Ecosystem Services Challenges in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: Coping with the Impacts of Sand Mining" Sustainability 12, no. 22: 9323. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229323

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