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Open AccessArticle

Adoption of Road Water Harvesting Practices and Their Impacts: Evidence from a Semi-Arid Region of Ethiopia

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Department of Rural Development &Agricultural Extension, Mekelle University, P.O. Box 231 Mekelle, Ethiopia
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School of Earth Sciences, Mekelle University, P.O. Box 231 Mekelle, Ethiopia
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MetaMeta Research, Postelstraat 2, 5211 EA‘s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8914; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218914
Received: 4 September 2020 / Revised: 20 October 2020 / Accepted: 23 October 2020 / Published: 27 October 2020
In the drylands of Ethiopia, several road water harvesting practices (RWHP) have been used to supplement rain-fed agriculture. However, factors affecting adoption of RWHP and their impacts were not studied systematically. Understanding the factors influencing the adoption of RWHP for sustainable agricultural intensification and climate resilience is critical to promoting such technologies. This paper investigates the impacts of using rural roads to harvest rainwater runoff and the factors causing farmers to adopt the practice. Road water harvesting is considered a possible mechanism for transformative climate change adaptation. By systematically capturing rainfall with rural road infrastructure, rain-related road damage is reduced, erosion and landscape degradation due to road development is lessened, and farm incomes increase due to the beneficial use of harvested water, resulting in an increased climate change resilience. This paper uses a binary probit model and propensity score matching methods based on a household survey of 159 households and 603 plots. The results of the probit model show that the education level of the household, family labor, access to markets, and distance of the farming plot from the farmer’s dwelling are statistically significant in explaining farmers’ adoption of RWHP in the study area. The casual impact estimation from the propensity score matching suggests that RWHP has positive and significant impacts on input uses (farmyard manure and fertilizer), crop yield, and farm income among the sample households. View Full-Text
Keywords: adoption; farmyard manure; fertilizer; income; Northern Ethiopia; road water harvesting; yield adoption; farmyard manure; fertilizer; income; Northern Ethiopia; road water harvesting; yield
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gebru, K.M.; Woldearegay, K.; van Steenbergen, F.; Beyene, A.; Vera, L.F.; Tesfay Gebreegziabher, K.; Alemayhu, T. Adoption of Road Water Harvesting Practices and Their Impacts: Evidence from a Semi-Arid Region of Ethiopia. Sustainability 2020, 12, 8914. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218914

AMA Style

Gebru KM, Woldearegay K, van Steenbergen F, Beyene A, Vera LF, Tesfay Gebreegziabher K, Alemayhu T. Adoption of Road Water Harvesting Practices and Their Impacts: Evidence from a Semi-Arid Region of Ethiopia. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):8914. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218914

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gebru, Kebede M.; Woldearegay, Kifle; van Steenbergen, Frank; Beyene, Aregawi; Vera, Letty F.; Tesfay Gebreegziabher, Kidane; Alemayhu, Taye. 2020. "Adoption of Road Water Harvesting Practices and Their Impacts: Evidence from a Semi-Arid Region of Ethiopia" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 8914. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218914

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