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Article

Spray Backstop: A Method to Reduce Orchard Spray Drift Potential without Limiting the Spray and Air Delivery

1
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
University of California Cooperative Extension, 142 Garden Hwy A, Yuba City, CA 95991, USA
3
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources—Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center, University of California, 9240 S. Riverbend Avenue, Parlier, CA 93648, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8862; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218862
Received: 14 September 2020 / Revised: 15 October 2020 / Accepted: 21 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
Unmanaged spray drift from orchard pesticide application contributes to environmental contamination and causes significant danger to farmworkers, nearby residential areas, and neighbors’ crops. Most drift control approaches do not guarantee adequate and uniform canopy spray coverage. Our goal was to develop a spray backstop system that could block drifting from the top without any negative impact on spray coverage and on-target deposition. The design included a foldable mast and a shade structure that covered the trees from the top. We used a continuous loop sampling to assess and quantify the effectiveness of spray backstop on drift potential reduction. We also collected leaf samples from different sections of trees to compare on-target deposition and coverage. The results showed that the spray backstop system could significantly (p-Value < 0.01) reduce drift potential from the top (78% on average). While we did not find any statistical difference in overall canopy deposition with and without the backstop system, we observed some improvement in treetops deposition. This experiment’s output suggests that growers may be able to adjust their air-assist sprayers for a more uniform spray coverage without concern about the off-target movement of spray droplets when they employ the spray backstop system.
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Keywords: air-assist; almond; coverage; deposition; drift; fluorometry; pesticide; spray air-assist; almond; coverage; deposition; drift; fluorometry; pesticide; spray
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pourreza, A.; Moghimi, A.; Niederholzer, F.J.A.; Larbi, P.A.; Zuniga-Ramirez, G.; Cheung, K.H.; Khorsandi, F. Spray Backstop: A Method to Reduce Orchard Spray Drift Potential without Limiting the Spray and Air Delivery. Sustainability 2020, 12, 8862. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218862

AMA Style

Pourreza A, Moghimi A, Niederholzer FJA, Larbi PA, Zuniga-Ramirez G, Cheung KH, Khorsandi F. Spray Backstop: A Method to Reduce Orchard Spray Drift Potential without Limiting the Spray and Air Delivery. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):8862. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218862

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pourreza, Alireza, Ali Moghimi, Franz J.A. Niederholzer, Peter A. Larbi, German Zuniga-Ramirez, Kyle H. Cheung, and Farzaneh Khorsandi. 2020. "Spray Backstop: A Method to Reduce Orchard Spray Drift Potential without Limiting the Spray and Air Delivery" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 8862. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218862

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