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Article

Wireless Charging of Electric Taxis: Understanding the Facilitators and Barriers to Its Introduction

1
WMG—Warwick Manufacturing Group, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
2
NTDC—National Transport Design Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 2TT, UK
3
Cenex—The Centre of Excellence for Low Carbon and Fuel Cell Technologies, Loughborough LE11 3UZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8798; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218798
Received: 1 October 2020 / Revised: 14 October 2020 / Accepted: 18 October 2020 / Published: 23 October 2020
The shift to electric vehicles has brought about the potential to reduce the environmental damage caused by road transport. However, several challenges prevent wider adoption of electric vehicles, such as: a lack of charging facilities, long charging times, limited range, and the inconvenience of cable charging. These barriers are more pronounced for taxis, which generally cover longer distances than regular cars and have fewer opportunities for recharging. This research aims to evaluate wireless charging for range extended electric taxis, as a strategy to minimise these challenges and facilitate the electrification of fleets. A mixed methods approach, combining quantitative vehicle tracking with qualitative interviews and focus groups with drivers and local authority representatives, provided an understanding of ‘facilitators’ and ‘barriers’ to the introduction of wireless chargers in London and Nottingham, UK. Results indicated that current wired charging infrastructure does not facilitate recharging opportunities during taxi working hours, causing longer shifts or lower earnings. Drivers reported running on a range extender petrol engine once the battery is depleted, limiting the environmental benefits of electric taxis. We conclude that wireless chargers could facilitate the increased driving range of existing electric taxis if installed where drivers stop more often. The results support the implementation of opportunistic, short but frequent charging boosts (known as choko-choko) as part of policies to alleviate the barriers to the introduction of wireless charging of electric taxis, and foster more sustainable means of road transportation. View Full-Text
Keywords: electric vehicles; wireless chargers; taxi; user experience; human-factors electric vehicles; wireless chargers; taxi; user experience; human-factors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oliveira, L.; Ulahannan, A.; Knight, M.; Birrell, S. Wireless Charging of Electric Taxis: Understanding the Facilitators and Barriers to Its Introduction. Sustainability 2020, 12, 8798. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218798

AMA Style

Oliveira L, Ulahannan A, Knight M, Birrell S. Wireless Charging of Electric Taxis: Understanding the Facilitators and Barriers to Its Introduction. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):8798. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218798

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oliveira, Luis, Arun Ulahannan, Matthew Knight, and Stewart Birrell. 2020. "Wireless Charging of Electric Taxis: Understanding the Facilitators and Barriers to Its Introduction" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 8798. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218798

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