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Open AccessReview

From Laboratory to Proximal Sensing Spectroscopy for Soil Organic Carbon Estimation—A Review

1
Centre of Research and Technology-Hellas (CERTH), Institute for Bio-Economy and Agri-Technology (iBO), Thessaloniki, 57001 Thermi, Greece
2
Laboratory of Remote Sensing, Spectroscopy, and GIS, Department of Agriculture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
3
Interbalkan Environment Center (i-BEC), 18 Loutron Str., 57200 Lagadas, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020443
Received: 21 November 2019 / Revised: 20 December 2019 / Accepted: 2 January 2020 / Published: 7 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green, Closed Loop, Circular Bio-Economy)
Rapid and cost-effective soil properties estimations are considered imperative for the monitoring and recording of agricultural soil condition for the implementation of site-specific management practices. Conventional laboratory measurements are costly and time-consuming, and, therefore, cannot be considered appropriate for large datasets. This article reviews laboratory and proximal sensing spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared (VNIR)–short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength region for soil organic carbon and soil organic matter estimation as an alternative to analytical chemistry measurements. The aim of this work is to report the progress made in the last decade on data preprocessing, calibration approaches, and system configurations used for VNIR-SWIR spectroscopy of soil organic carbon and soil organic matter estimation. We present and compare the results of over fifty selective studies and discuss the factors that affect the accuracy of spectroscopic measurements for both laboratory and in situ applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: reflectance spectroscopy; soil spectral libraries; VNIR-SWIR; soil organic matter; carbon sequestration reflectance spectroscopy; soil spectral libraries; VNIR-SWIR; soil organic matter; carbon sequestration
MDPI and ACS Style

Angelopoulou, T.; Balafoutis, A.; Zalidis, G.; Bochtis, D. From Laboratory to Proximal Sensing Spectroscopy for Soil Organic Carbon Estimation—A Review. Sustainability 2020, 12, 443.

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