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Article

Can Energy Depletion of Wild Atlantic Salmon Kelts Negotiating Hydropower Facilities Lead to Reduced Survival?

1
National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark (DTU Aqua), 8600 Silkeborg, Denmark
2
Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA), 9296 Tromsø, Norway
3
SINTEF Energy Research, 7034 Trondheim, Norway
4
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7034 Trondheim, Norway
5
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), 7034 Trondheim, Norway
6
Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7341; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187341
Received: 2 July 2020 / Revised: 26 August 2020 / Accepted: 27 August 2020 / Published: 7 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydropower Impacts on Aquatic Biota)
Repeat spawners constitute an important component of Atlantic salmon populations, but survival of post-spawning individuals (kelts) are often compromised by anthropogenic structures such as hydropower plants (HPPs). Potential effects of HPPs include migration delays and associated increased energy depletion, which potentially results in increased overall mortality. We combined a detailed 3D hydraulic model with high-resolution 3D tracking of tagged kelts (length 73–104 cm) to obtain estimates of kelt movement through water. These estimates were then used in an energetics model to estimate hourly energy expenditure while negotiating the HPP area. Hourly kelt energy expenditure varied between 0.8 and 10.1 kJ × h−1 and was dependent on kelt length. Degree of additional energy depletion can amount to several percent of remaining energy content (our study indicates 4–5 percentage points) potentially leading to reduced post-spawning survival. In turn, this can nullify the iteroparous breeding strategy and jeopardize long-term stability and persistence of Atlantic salmon populations inhabiting HPP rivers. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-resolution 3D telemetry; 3D hydraulic modeling; anthropogenic structures; river connectivity; energetics model; energy expenditure high-resolution 3D telemetry; 3D hydraulic modeling; anthropogenic structures; river connectivity; energetics model; energy expenditure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baktoft, H.; Gjelland, K.Ø.; Szabo-Meszaros, M.; Silva, A.T.; Riha, M.; Økland, F.; Alfredsen, K.; Forseth, T. Can Energy Depletion of Wild Atlantic Salmon Kelts Negotiating Hydropower Facilities Lead to Reduced Survival? Sustainability 2020, 12, 7341. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187341

AMA Style

Baktoft H, Gjelland KØ, Szabo-Meszaros M, Silva AT, Riha M, Økland F, Alfredsen K, Forseth T. Can Energy Depletion of Wild Atlantic Salmon Kelts Negotiating Hydropower Facilities Lead to Reduced Survival? Sustainability. 2020; 12(18):7341. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187341

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baktoft, Henrik, Karl Ø. Gjelland, Marcell Szabo-Meszaros, Ana T. Silva, Milan Riha, Finn Økland, Knut Alfredsen, and Torbjørn Forseth. 2020. "Can Energy Depletion of Wild Atlantic Salmon Kelts Negotiating Hydropower Facilities Lead to Reduced Survival?" Sustainability 12, no. 18: 7341. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187341

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