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Open AccessArticle

Application of the Integrated Design Process (IDP) Method to the Design of Riverside on the Example of Żmigród (Poland)

Institute of Landscape Architecture, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Grunwaldzka 55, 50-357 Wrocław, Poland
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Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6684; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166684
Received: 31 May 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 14 August 2020 / Published: 18 August 2020
Today, natural resources of urban areas have been given the rank of a necessary tool for combating climate change. Many cities are trying to manage biologically active areas of great quality by applying a blue-green infrastructure (BGI) strategy. Designing areas such as riverside areas belonging to BGI is particularly challenging. On the one hand, they are environmentally valuable areas requiring protection. On the other hand, they form urban public spaces subject to requirements of urban continuity as well as social and cultural conditions. The authors of the article argue that the optimal way of shaping riverside areas in cities that responds to diverse conditions (environmental, economic, legal, social) can be achieved by applying an integrated system of cooperation between designers known as the integrated design process (IDP) in the design process. The study aimed to answer the question of whether the integrated design process (IDP) that combines both the expert and social approach at the first stage, in the pre-concept phase may be optimal when developing riverside areas as part of blue-green infrastructure (BGI). The method was originally applied to architectural design, therefore the authors analyzed to what extent its assumptions may be used in the waterfront design process. First, the authors’ study compares design processes (traditional and integrated) for use in these processes of expert and social perspective. As a result, the integrated design process (IDP) has been considered as an optimal design process to create such areas. Then, the authors analyze the waterfront design process in Żmigród. The authors wanted to see to what extent the process corresponds to the assumptions of the IDP method. The authors point out the stages that implement assumptions of the IDP method partially or not at all and indicate the reasons for such a situation. The authors evaluated the role of various stakeholders. The analysis and critique of Żmigród case study presented here provide conclusions regarding the possibilities and limitations of the IDP method when implementing blue-green infrastructure projects in a small town. View Full-Text
Keywords: integrated design process; riverside landscape designing; blue-green infrastructure (BGI); community participation; Żmigród integrated design process; riverside landscape designing; blue-green infrastructure (BGI); community participation; Żmigród
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Bocheńska-Skałecka, A.; Walter, E. Application of the Integrated Design Process (IDP) Method to the Design of Riverside on the Example of Żmigród (Poland). Sustainability 2020, 12, 6684.

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