Next Article in Journal
The Paradox of “Eyes on the Street”: Pedestrian Density and Fear of Crime in Yaoundé, Cameroon
Next Article in Special Issue
COVID-19 and the UN Sustainable Development Goals: Threat to Solidarity or an Opportunity?
Previous Article in Journal
Sustainability of Railway Undertaking Services with Lean Philosophy in Risk Management—Case Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Do German Student Biology Teachers Intend to Eat Sustainably? Extending the Theory of Planned Behavior with Nature Relatedness and Environmental Concern
Open AccessArticle

Mapping Master Students’ Processes of Problem Solving and Learning in Groups in Sustainability Education

Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Uppsala University, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5299; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135299
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 24 June 2020 / Accepted: 28 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Education for Sustainability)
Sustainability challenges in tourism are widely discussed. There is a huge need for education in the field of destination development. Students require appropriate problem-solving skills. This article examines the master’s course in destination development at Uppsala University, Campus Gotland, with the aim of increasing students’ skills in solving sustainability problems. The course took place in the spring semester of 2020 with the main goal of improving students’ skills in formulating and solving sustainable challenges in groups. This was achieved by activating the heterogeneity of the group, seeking relevant information and facts, and organising and carrying out the task with a design-thinking methodology. Students were provided with real problems or challenges by tourist companies, authorities and other interest groups on the island of Gotland. The purpose of this study is to describe the group of students as well as joint learning processes and knowledge needed in the work towards sustainable solutions. The major implication of the study is that the course gave the students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of both the barriers and benefits of working with heterogeneous groups. Furthermore, the study revealed a number of factors that all organisations would need to take into account in order to improve the effectiveness of their work towards sustainable solutions. View Full-Text
Keywords: design thinking; group processes; heterogeneity; individual and collective learning; problem solving design thinking; group processes; heterogeneity; individual and collective learning; problem solving
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Oxenswärdh, A.; Persson-Fischier, U. Mapping Master Students’ Processes of Problem Solving and Learning in Groups in Sustainability Education. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5299.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop