Next Article in Journal
The Impact of the Weight Status on Cardiovascular Parameters Related to Physical Effort in Young Athletes
Next Article in Special Issue
How Attractive for Walking Are the Main Streets of a Shrinking City?
Previous Article in Journal
An Information Management Conceptual Approach for the Strategies Alignment Collaborative Process
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Cost Benefit Analysis for the Concept of a Smart City: How to Measure the Efficiency of Smart Solutions?
Open AccessArticle

Formulation Matters! The Failure of Integrating Landscape Fragmentation Policy

1
Department of Physical Geography and Geoecology, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Chittussiho 10, 10 00 Slezská Ostrava, Czech Republic
2
Department of Ecosystem Biology, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, Branišovská 1760, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
3
Department of Geography, Faculty of Science, Jan Evangelista Purkyně University, České mládeže 8, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 3962; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12103962
Received: 7 April 2020 / Revised: 9 May 2020 / Accepted: 10 May 2020 / Published: 12 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts for Regeneration of Industrial Cities)
Uncoordinated land development results in landscape fragmentation, which is a complex and serious environmental threat to the Czech landscape. It poses a challenge especially for (post)industrial urban agglomerations with extremely low connectivity of green–blue infrastructure. Environmental and spatial planning strategic policy documents are considered to represent long-term communicative instruments for effective environmental protection. Current experience shows that policy documents are commonly poorly integrated, and burdened by formulation inconsistencies. In this study, we (i) specified the driving factors causing landscape fragmentation, describing how the issue is understood by environmental and spatial planning strategic policy documents and (ii) identified criteria for the formulation of these documents at the national and regional governance levels. A content analysis of 12 strategic policy documents enabled the calculation of internal consistency and an assessment of their inter- and cross-sectoral integration. The results revealed formulation flaws in documents, leading to serious misunderstandings of the meaning of the landscape fragmentation between environmental (biocentric) and planning (anthropocentric) policy domains. This aspect makes the horizontal and further vertical cooperation between policy domains difficult. Guidelines for the formulation of strategic policy documents may improve their intelligibility and support smoother environmental policy integration. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental policy integration; policy documents; landscape fragmentation; internal consistency; SMART policies; green environmental policy integration; policy documents; landscape fragmentation; internal consistency; SMART policies; green
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Aubrechtová, T.; Semančíková, E.; Raška, P. Formulation Matters! The Failure of Integrating Landscape Fragmentation Policy. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3962. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12103962

AMA Style

Aubrechtová T, Semančíková E, Raška P. Formulation Matters! The Failure of Integrating Landscape Fragmentation Policy. Sustainability. 2020; 12(10):3962. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12103962

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aubrechtová, Tereza; Semančíková, Eva; Raška, Pavel. 2020. "Formulation Matters! The Failure of Integrating Landscape Fragmentation Policy" Sustainability 12, no. 10: 3962. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12103962

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop