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Open AccessArticle

Grocery Delivery or Customer Pickup—Influences on Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions in Munich

Chair of Energy Economy and Application Technology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Technical University of Munich, 80333 München, Germany
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Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 641; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030641
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2019 / Accepted: 23 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intermodal Transportation and Sustainable Mobility)
The number of supermarkets offering grocery delivery has increased in recent years. Many studies conclude that CO2 emission savings result from this concept. Since the delivery of groceries also consumes energy and produces emissions, break-even points can be calculated, where the delivery is environmentally beneficial compared to customer pickup. In this paper, influences of differing vehicle use on break-even points for savings of energy and CO2 emissions are analyzed for the case of Haidhausen Süd, a district in Munich, Germany. Internal combustion engine and electric vehicles are investigated to depict current as well as future trends. After an introduction to the methodology used, the potential to save energy and CO2 emissions related to the delivery of groceries in the chosen district of Munich are evaluated. Subsequently, influences on the break-even points are presented and discussed. As the results show, a delivery of groceries leads to energy and carbon dioxide savings in a wide range of private vehicle use for grocery shopping trips. Nevertheless, if the complete customer vehicle fleet is electrified, the use of delivery vehicles with an internal combustion engine could cause an additional environmental impact at the current modal split for shopping trips in Germany. View Full-Text
Keywords: grocery delivery; energy-savings; CO2-savings; Munich; break-even point; electric delivery vehicle; customer pickup; modal shift grocery delivery; energy-savings; CO2-savings; Munich; break-even point; electric delivery vehicle; customer pickup; modal shift
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Hardi, L.; Wagner, U. Grocery Delivery or Customer Pickup—Influences on Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions in Munich. Sustainability 2019, 11, 641.

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