Next Article in Journal
Ventilation as an Indispensable Tool for Healthy Constructions: Comparison of Alicante’s Urban Railway Tunnels
Next Article in Special Issue
In Vitro Study of Butyric Acid Deodorization Potential by Indigenously Constructed Bacterial Consortia and Pure Cultures from Pit Latrine Fecal Sludge
Previous Article in Journal
A Review of Chemicals to Produce Activated Carbon from Agricultural Waste Biomass
Previous Article in Special Issue
Contribution of Microbial Residues Obtained from Lignin and Cellulose on Humus Formation
Open AccessArticle

Decentralized Valorization of Residual Flows as an Alternative to the Traditional Urban Waste Management System: The Case of Peñalolén in Santiago de Chile

1
Sub-Department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University and Research, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands
2
Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Diagonal Las Torres 2640 Peñalolén, Santiago de Chile, Chile
3
LeAF, Bornse Weilanden 9, 6708 WG Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6206; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226206
Received: 17 September 2019 / Revised: 17 October 2019 / Accepted: 21 October 2019 / Published: 6 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Organic Waste Management)
Urban residual flows contain significant amounts of valuable nutrients, which, if recovered, could serve as input for the own city needs or those of its immediate surroundings. In this study, the possibilities for decentralized recovery of nutrient rich residual flows in Santiago, Chile, are studied by means of a case study considering technical and socio-economic criteria. In particular, we calculate circularity indicators for organic matter (OM), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) and cost–benefits of household and community on-site technological alternatives. Kitchen waste (KW) and garden residues (GR) as well as urine were considered as system inputs whereas urban agriculture, municipality green, or peri-urban agriculture were the considered destinations for nutrients recovered. The technologies studied were anaerobic digestion, vermicomposting, and composting, while urine storage and struvite precipitation were considered for nutrient recovery from urine. Material flow analysis was used to visualize the inputs and outputs of the baseline situation (the traditional urban waste management system), and of the different household and municipality resource recovery scenarios (the decentralized valorization systems). Our findings show that decentralized valorization of KW and GR are a clear win–win policy, since they can not only produce important environmental benefits for the city in the long run, but also important cost savings considering the landfill fees and residues transportation of the current centralized waste management system. View Full-Text
Keywords: waste management; circular metabolism; decentralized valorization; nutrient recovery; material flow analysis waste management; circular metabolism; decentralized valorization; nutrient recovery; material flow analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

de Kraker, J.; Kujawa-Roeleveld, K.; J. Villena, M.; Pabón-Pereira, C. Decentralized Valorization of Residual Flows as an Alternative to the Traditional Urban Waste Management System: The Case of Peñalolén in Santiago de Chile. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6206.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop